Encyclopedia of Shinto Kokugakuin University
 main menu
  »New EOS site

  »Home

  »Foreword

  »Guide to Usage

  »Contributors & Translators

  

  »Movies List
 Links

Folk Religion


Ebisu shinkō

This refers to the cult of Ebisu, a kami of fortune, believed to watch over livelihoods and to bring luck. Since medieval times, Ebisu has been one of the seven gods of good fortune (shichifukujin) and is, together with Daikoku, a major representative of all kami of fortune (fukujin). His image (sh...

Fukujin shinkō

Cultic worship of "deities of good fortune" or "good-luck deities" (fukujin), namely those that respond to human prayers for happiness. It should be noted that the term fukujin is not a proper noun, but a general referent given to any deity whose primary function is thought to be the granting of bl...

Gongen shinkō

Belief in the incarnation of a Buddha or bodhisattva for the sake of bringing salvation to all sentient beings. Terms having the same meaning include gonge and kegen. There also arose the idea, as seen in the honji-suijaku theory , that the kami of Japan are likewise such manifestations or that the...

Goryō shinkō

The belief that spiritual beings intimidate society at large with calamity and pestilence and must therefore be appeased in order to restore tranquility and, in turn, to bring about prosperity. To placate and send them away, gatherings known as goryō-e ("meetings with august spirits") were hel...

Hayarigami Shinkō

The faddish worship of kami and buddhas that experience ephemeral popularity based on claims that they provide some concrete benefit or power. The term is sometimes written with characters meaning "momentary-flower-deity ֿ," indicating that the phenomenon springs up and blooms rapidly, but the...

Ishi shinkō

Stone cults in Japan that may be seen as falling into three general categories: (1) what may be called "stone deification" (shintai); (2) belief in a "rock abode" (iwakura) to which the deity descends; and (3) the concept of iwasaka, an area that has been encircled by piles of stones, where a god ...

Kōshin shinkō

A day on which the 7th "stem" (kō) in the Chinese zodiacal system combines with the 9th "branch" (shin 'monkey') is known as kōshin, when believers spend an abstemious, all-night vigil for the sake of their longevity. The custom goes back to the Chinese Taoist Ge Hong (283-343), who in Ba...

Myōken shinkō

Worship of the bodhisattva Myōken, who is the deification of the North Star and Ursa Major (the Big Dipper). The bodhisattva Myōken is also referred to as Myōken Daishi, Sonshōō, and the bodhisattva Hokushin. She is prized as the protector of the nation, the suppressor of ...

Ryūjin shinkō

Ryūjin ("dragon kami") faith is a form of religious thought and practice associated with dragons, a mythical sacred animal of ancient China. Although Japanese ryūjin worship was influenced by China, the Japanese dragon as an object of faith was a deified snake, a symbol of a water kami (s...

Senzo saishi

The celebration of family forebears. Typically centers on one's parents and the generations preceding them, but there are also observances of honor and gratitude for a founding ancestor. Special veneration was shown particularly in the court aristocracy and the warrior class, as well as in merchant...

Tendō shinkō

Religious thought and practice focused on the deity Hinokami (see Amaterasu) and Hinokami's child, Tendō Hōshi, transmitted within the folk traditions of the Tsushima Islands (a five-island archipelago) in a form that also subsumed belief in agricultural and ancestral spirits (kokurei and...

Tsukimono

A spirit which attaches itself to a human being, usually an evil spirit that causes disasters. The attachment of a tsukimono to a person is a form of possession. However, it is not a spontaneous and intentional possession in which one is in control, as in the case of a spiritual medium. Rather, it ...





"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
4-10-28 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-8440, Japan
URL http://21coe.kokugakuin.ac.jp/
Copyright ©2002-2006 Kokugakuin University. All rights reserved.
Ver. 1.3