Encyclopedia of Shinto Kokugakuin University
 main menu
  »New EOS site

  »Home

  »Foreword

  »Guide to Usage

  »Contributors & Translators

  

  »Movies List
 Links

Basic Terms


« 1 2 (3) 4 5 6 »

Kinnō-sonnō

Sonnō is reverence for the imperial house, while the Japanese kinnō adds a strong practical element to a sense of loyalty to the emperor. This type of imperial loyalty was advocated during the Edo period by the followers of Yamazaki Ansai, based on the Zhu Xi Neo-Confucian idea of obligat...

Kiyū

To die and go to the hidden realm (kakuriyo). Ki here does not mean to return to the origin, but simply, "to go". There is a strong idea in the Shintō view of the Other Realm (takaikan) that after people die they become ancestral spirits that continue to protect their descendants and watch ove...

Kokutai

This can be interpreted from a legal perspective as the "form of a nation." However, it generally indicates a country's spiritual and moral aspects such as its national character, national customs, national qualities, national prestige, moral obligations (meibun), foundation, its true nature and it...

Konpaku

A Sinic term that refers to the soul. In ancient China kon was related to yang (of yin-yang dualism) and to the dimension of mental activity, while haku was related to yin and the somatic, physiological dimension. Thus, the soul had a two-layered structure. Accordingly, when a person died it was be...

Kotodama

Kotodama refers to the spiritual power that is contained within words, but also refers to the conception that spiritual power can be manifested through the intonation of words. This is explained as an aspect of animism, or alternatively is explained from the perspective of its function as influenci...

Kunitama

The spirit of the land. Kunitama refers to the sanctification or spiritualization of the land itself. In ancient times it was considered that the rule of each province was not only a task of human beings alone; it could only be accomplished through the power of the unseen kami enshrined in each are...

Kuniumi

The birth of the land. The creation of the land by Izanagi and Izanami following the command of the heavenly deities (amatsukamigami) to compose and solidify (shurikosei, also read tsukurikatame) the floating land. The two deities chose (mitate) a heavenly pillar (ama no mihashira) on Onogoro islan...

Kuniyuzuri

The "transfer of the land." The term indicates a series of episodes in the Kojiki and the Nihongi related to the transfer of the land of Japan to the descendants of the heavenly kami (amatsukami) by Ōkuninushi, a terrestial kami (kunitsukami). After Susanoo, the brother of Amaterasu, descended...

Kushimitama

The wondrous soul. Within conceptions of the soul, the kushimitama is a type of soul that brings about mysterious manifestations in human beings through supernatural power. It appears in conjunction with the sakimitama, the providing soul, which is the power behind the harvest. In the first volume ...

Magakoto

Maga- is the opposite of naho (straight, correct) and thus means bent or evil. It is used to describe misfortunes, wicked deeds, and calamities. Shintō does not assume evil to be absolute but rather conceives it as a distorted or abnormal condition. The mythical explanation of the idea of maga...

Makoto

Makoto means 'sincerity' or 'earnestness' or 'a heart free of falsehood'; it is one of the cardinal virtues of Shintō. Great emphasis has been placed on it since ancient times, as is reflected in the words of the edict issued by Emperor Kōtoku in the seventh month of 645: "We should all t...

Marebito

Rare person. A term originally referring to a visitor. Orikuchi Shinobu defined marebito as spiritual entities that periodically visit village communities from the other world — the "everlasting world" (tokoyo) across the sea — to bring their residents happiness and good fortune. Orikuchi...

Marōdogami

Guest kami. A non-indigenous kami that visits or is invited by the local community and later resides permanently within that community. The term may also refer to a kami that, although indigenous, has yielded its site of enshrinement within the shrine to a new, more powerful kami and is being enshr...

meijōseichoku

Literally, brightness, purity, sincerity and uprightness. In Shintō, this term is used to express the ideal state of one's heart. Meijōseichoku incorporates the ideas of a true heart, a sincere heart, an upright heart, and a readiness to serve the kami. When appearing in the Imperial decr...

Miitsu

Miitsu can also written . Miitsu refers to the powerful authority of a kami or an emperor, or to a divine spirit that possesses such power. As recorded in the Bizen no kuni Fudoki , the Emperor Sujin sends Takeokumi on a punitive expedition against the Tsuchigumo of Bizen province, but the enem...

Mikotomochi

Literally, "bearer of the honorable word." A mikotomochi was a court official dispatched to a provincial post by imperial order. Book XI of the Shaku Nihongi states: "According to my personal records, my mentor explained that a mikotomochi is a person who receives and bears the 'honorable word' (mi...

Misogi

Ablutions. The practice of washing one's entire body and, in doing so, purifying oneself from the misfortunes, sins and pollutions (tsumi kegare ) that have become attached to the body. According to the Kojiki and Nihon shoki, the mythical origins of this practice can be found in the story of how I...

Mitamanofuyu

"Spiritual blessing." This is a term used to express the ancient belief that a person continuously receives the blessings which emanate from the spiritual power of the kami and the emperors. The term mitama refers to a spirit and the term fuyu means to touch, shake or multiply. Therefore, mitama no...

Mitate

To choose and erect something (like a pillar). Alternatively, this can be used to refer specifically to the thing which has been erected. Examples of the use of mitate are found in both the Kojiki and the Nihon shoki during the wedding scene of Izanagi and Izanami on the island of Onogoro. It is wr...

mogari

All-night vigil for a deceased person; wake. The kanji for mogari can also be read as agari or araki. This is the rite of placing the corpse of a deceased person in a reception room, temple, or some other place that has been specifically constructed for this purpose (i.e., a moya ("mourning room");...



« 1 2 (3) 4 5 6 »


"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
4-10-28 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-8440, Japan
URL http://21coe.kokugakuin.ac.jp/
Copyright ©2002-2006 Kokugakuin University. All rights reserved.
Ver. 1.3