Encyclopedia of Shinto Kokugakuin University
 main menu
  »New EOS site

  »Home

  »Foreword

  »Guide to Usage

  »Contributors & Translators

  

  »Movies List
 Links

Modern Sectarian Groups


(1) 2 3 4 ... 6 »

§ Shinto-Derived Religions

In the modern era Shinto-derived religious organizations can be broadly divided into two types, namely "sectarian Shinto" (kyōha Shintō) and "Shinto-derived new religions" (Shintōkei shinshūkyō). The term "sectarian Shinto" is widely used to indicate the thirteen sects ...

Ananaikyō

An Ōmoto-lineage new religion. Its founder Nakano Yonosuke (1887-1974) learned of Ōmoto initially through the first Ōmoto incident of 1921 and joined the movement due to his attraction to the personality of Deguchi Onisaburō (1871-1948). Nakano studied the concept of "mediated...

Byakkō Shinkōkai

A new religion founded by Goi Masahisa (1916-1980) from the Ōmoto and Seichō no Ie lineages, with an emphasis on two characteristic Ōmoto doctrines, the notion that all religions emanate from the same root (bankyō dōkon), and the principle of world peace.     &nbs...

Chikakusan Minshukyō Kyōdan

A religious group based on the mountain-worship cult of Kiso Ontake (Mount Ontake in the Kiso region). It began in the mid-Meiji era when Nehashi Umetarō (1868-1922) founded the Chikaku Kōsha (Chikaku Religious Association). When Nehashi died in 1922, his third son Shigefumi, who had join...

Chūshinkai

A religious movement focused on divination and onomancy and founded by Kumazaki Ken'ō (1881-1961). While working at primary schools and in the newspaper business, Kumazaki had developed a unique system of shorthand, and engaged in the study of divination, fortune telling, onomancy, and phrenol...

Daihizenkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Orimo Nami (1893-1966). Born in Saitama Prefecture, Orimo grew up in difficult circumstances, working from a very young age as a nursemaid, live-in servant, and in a spinning mill. After marrying she worked at numerous occupations with her husband, but both ...

Ennōkyō

A new religious movement founded by Fukada Chiyoko (1887-1925). Fukada began her religious activities in 1919 after receiving a divine revelation that directed her to serve as the messenger of the gods and their vessel on earth. For five and one-half years, Fukada employed her own unique style of e...

Fusōkyō

One of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto. It was organized as a group by Shishino Nakaba (1844-84) from the Satsuma domain based on the mountain cult to Mount Fuji (Fuji shinkō) founded by Hasegawa Kakugyō (1541?-1646?), but it developed as a religious group with strong Shinto coloring ...

Hachidai Ryūō Daishizen Aishinkyōdan

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Ishikawa Sen (1886-1961). Born in Hokkaido, Ishikawa established various businesses, including a restaurant and clothing store. While undergoing abdominal surgery in 1930, Ishikawa became possessed (kamigakari) by a spirit that commanded him to renew the wor...

Hachidai Ryūōjin Hakkō Seidan

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Demura Ryūsei (1926-). Born in Hokkaido, Demura was devout from an early age and regularly used to clean the Inari and other small shrines in his area. It is reported that from the age of ten he developed spiritual powers and began to deliver various pr...

Hachirakukai Kyōdan

A Shinto-derived new religious movement started by Ogawa Kōichirō (1919-80). It is said that Ogawa had been gripped by nebulous fears of death since early childhood due to the various misfortunes that had befallen successive generations of his family. For these reasons he came into contac...

Hi no Oshie

Teaching of the Sun. A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Sakuma Nikkō (1884-1954; Nikkō means "sun-light"). An affectionate and filial son, Sakuma developed an interest in the afterlife, the existence of the soul and the reality of divine beings (kami) after the death of his father i...

Hikari Kyōkai

A new religion derived from Ōmoto. It was founded by the painter Okamoto Tenmei (1897-1963), who had been the senior editor of the periodical published by Ōmoto between 1923 and 1935. Okamoto's separation from Ōmoto and his own, independent religious activities were initiated by the ...

Hizuki no Miya

A new religion of Shinto origin, founded by Fujimoto Toshinari (1930-1989). The founding of the religion is dated from January 11, 1956, when Fujimoto received the following revelation from the kami Amaterasu ōmikami: "As currently existing religions are not true, I will transmit the true reli...

Honbushin

A religious group of the Tenrikyō lineage which seceded from Honmichi. Founded by Ōnishi Tama (1916-1969), the group originated in 1961 within Honmichi as the Tenri Mirokukai (Tenri Miroku Association). This group claimed that Ōnishi Tama, second daughter of Ōnishi Aijrō (1...

Honmichi

A religious group founded by Ōnishi Aijirō (1881-1958). Since Ōnishi was originally a teacher in Tenrikyō, the doctrines of Honmichi strongly resemble those found in its parent sect. In 1913 Aijirō came to the conviction that he himself embodied the "principle of the living...

Ijun

A Shinto-derived new religion from Okinawa founded by Takayasu Ryūsen (1934-). Takayasu was born in the Okinawan city of Naha in 1934 and, from an early age, played children's roles in the Okinawan theatre. It is reported that, while being evacuated to Taiwan near the end of World War II, he e...

Ishinkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Hashiguchi Reizui (1879-1963). Hashiguchi was born in Kagoshima City and worked as an official in the post and telegraphic services. Following the case of high treason revolving around socialist and anarchist Kōtoku Shūsui in 1910, he began to feel...

Izumo Ōyashirokyō

A sectarian Shinto movement founded by Senge Takatomi (1845-1918) and included in the original thirteen pre-war sects of Shinto. Closely involved with matters of government religious administration around the time of the Meiji Restoration and perceiving the prevailing trends of those policies, Seng...

Izumo Shinyū Kyōkai

A Shinto-derived new religion founded in 1968 by Hosoya Seiko (1927-) after she had practiced austerities in a number of places including Izumo, Nara and Eiheiji (a prominent Zen Buddhist temple in Fukui Prefecture). As the number of followers expanded, the group moved the following year from Hakue...



(1) 2 3 4 ... 6 »


"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
4-10-28 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-8440, Japan
URL http://21coe.kokugakuin.ac.jp/
Copyright ©2002-2006 Kokugakuin University. All rights reserved.
Ver. 1.3