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Modern Sectarian Groups


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Tensei Shinbikai

A Shinto-derived new religion strongly influenced by Sekai Kyūseikyō. Its founder Iwanaga Kayoko (1934-) became a member of Sekai Kyūseikyō in 1958. Her husband Hidekazu also joined, and together they alternated leadership of the movement's Ujina branch center in Hiroshima. Due ...

Tensha Tsuchimikado Shintō Honchō

A religious movement drawing its inspiration from Tsuchimikado Shintō (Tensha Shintō) which was established in the early modern period by the Tsuchimikado family (descendants of the Heian period Yin-Yang ritualist Abe no Seimei). Dissolved in 1870, Tsuchimikado Shintō was revived in ...

Tenshin Seikyō

A new religious movement founded by Shimada Seiichi (1896-1985). Seiichi was born the second son of a farming family in Kazo City in Saitama Prefecture. It is said that Shimada's birth had been prophesied a year before by a kami that had periodically possessed his elder brother since four years ear...

Tenshindō Kyōdan

A Shinto-derived new religion with strong eclectic tendencies, founded by Tamura Reishō (1890-1968). While working in the office of the Governor-General of Korea, Reishō studied the Daoistic magical arts transmitted in Korea since ancient times. It is said that after returning to Japan in...

Tenshinkyō Shin'yūden Kyōkai

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Kamiide Fusae (1922-1980). Having become a devotee of Tenrikyō due through her aunt's introduction, Kamiide had a sudden experience of spirit possession (kamigakari) in 1958. The oracle she received was from the "kami of heaven, the original kami," who ...

Tenshō Kōtai Jingūkyō

A Shinto-based new religion founded by Kitamura Sayo (1900-1967). Kitamura was born into a farming family in Kumage district in Yamaguchi Prefecture, but married into the Kitamura household, where she experienced a very strict mother-in-law. After one of family's outbuildings was destroyed in 1942 ...

Tenshōkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Senba Hideo (1925-) and his wife Senba Kimiko, both of whom were born in Hokkaido. Senba Hideo's family were devotees of Tenrikyō, but when Hideo became ill in March 1953, the couple went to the Terahama branch of Ontakekyō in Hokkaido and became m...

Tenshūkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Unagami Haruho (1896-1965). Its origins lie in Unagami's dissatisfaction with Buddhism, whereupon he took up the study of Shinto and established the group Kōtokukai in the Denmachō area of Yotsuya district, Tokyo. Initially Unagami's group was affi...

Tokumitsukyō

A Shinto-derived religious movement founded by Kanada Tokumitsu (1863-1919). Kanada was born in Osaka Prefecture on September 20, 1863, as the eldest son of Kanada Tokuhei. He subsequently succeeded to head of the Kanada household of relatives. In 1871 he became an apprentice to Asaka Kyūhei a...

Worldmate (formerly Cosmomate)

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Fukami Seizan (aka Fukami Tōshū) (1951-). Fukami, whose real name is Handa Haruhisa, was born in Nishinomiya in Hyogo Prefecture and is a graduate of Dōshisha University. From his teenage years he was influenced influenced by the thought of Se...

Yamakage Shintō

A new religion that emerged from the so-called "ancient Shinto (Ko Shintō)" tradition. The Yamakage family does not feature in historical accounts, but it claims to be an old Shinto family that was deeply trusted by and served successive generations of the imperial household. According to what...

Yamatokyō

A Shinto-derived new religious movement founded by Hozumi Kenkō (1913-76), who had experienced religious practice at the Shugendō center Dewa Sanzan. It began in 1931 when Kenkō established the Yudonosan Kitōjo (Mount Yudono Invocatory Prayer Center). Even today, the group's fai...

Zenrinkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Rikihisa Tatsusai (1906-77). Rikihisa's father Tatsususaburō had been a spirit medium and head of a regional branch of Shintō Jikkōkyō, but after his death, his son Tatsusai vowed to undertake twenty years of practice to save all the suff...



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