Encyclopedia of Shinto Kokugakuin University
 main menu
  »New EOS site

  »Home

  »Foreword

  »Guide to Usage

  »Contributors & Translators

  

  »Movies List
 Links

Modern Sectarian Groups


« 1 (2) 3 4 5 6 »

Izumokyō

Although not counted as one of the prewar thirteen Shinto sects, Izumokyō is a religious organization with characteristics reminiscent of sectarian Shinto (Kyōha Shintō). It was organized by Kitajima Naganori (1834-93), who was born into the Kitajima family, one of the traditional he...

Jieidō

A religious movement in the lineage of Sekai Kyūseikyō, founded by Katsunuma Hisako (1927-), who married into a farming household and became a member of Sekai Kyūseikyō when she was healed of heart disease in 1969. Katsunuma developed paranormal powers and attracted followers, b...

Jikkōkyō

One of the thirteen sects of pre-war Shinto. Jikkōkyō was based on Fujidō, founded by Hasegawa Kakugyō (born in Nagasaki, 1541-1646) and known as one of several early-modern mountain cults focused on Mount Fuji (Fuji shinkō). Organized as Jikkōsha (Jikkō Associati...

Jingūkyō

A Shinto organization established in the Meiji era. While not being included as one of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto, it possessed the characteristics of sect Shinto (kyōha Shintō) until the mid-Meiji period. Organized by Urata Nagatami and others, it had as its first Superintendent...

Kakushin Shūkyō Nipponkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion. The group's origins go back to 1940, when the "Father-deity Kotoshironushi no ōkami" descended upon Chitose Makami (1879-1986), revealing her previous lives and imparting divine powers to her. For the next ten years, Chitose prepared herself for her role in the s...

Kannagarakyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Mizuno Fusa (1883-1970). Fusa was born in Hiroshima Prefecture to parents who had earlier produced nine children, all of whom had either been premature births, stillborn, or died young. After making daily visits to a Koyasu Kannon ("easy childbirth Kannon") ...

Kikueikai Kyōdan

A religious movement founded in 1928 by the sculptor of Buddhist images Hayashi Shikō (1901-88). Shikō claimed an experience in which a golden sphere with the form of a "nine-star divination pattern" came floating towards him,1 after which he began to engage in spiritual healing. He conti...

Kogi Shintō

A movement founded by the Shinto priest Kuwabara Yachio (1910-) after World War II. Upon graduating from Kokugakuin University in 1941, Kuwabara served as head of Ōyamatsumi Shrine, and then became a Suppliant Priest (negi) at Kashima Shrine and was in charge of the Kashima National Spiritual ...

Konkōkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion and one of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto. Founded by Konkō Daijin (1814-83) (original name, Akazawa Bunji), who was born into a farming household in present-day Okayama Prefecture. After experiencing a succession of disasters and personal illnesses, Akazawa ...

Koshintō Senpōkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Masai Yoshimitsu (1907-1970), and known for its claim to be related to the tradition of "ancient Shinto" (Koshintō) disseminated by Hirata Atsutane. It was Miyaji Suii (also known as Kakiwa, 1852-1904) who established a system of divine laws, techniques...

Kōso Kōtai Jingū Amatsukyō

A This is aShinto-derived new religion established by Takeuchi Kiyomaro (also read Ōmaro) (1874-1965). The Takeuchi family, which was from Shinmei Village in the Nui district of Toyama Pprefecture, had in its possession an ancient text known as the "Takeuchi document" (Takeuchi monjo) wh...

Kurozumikyō

One of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto, Kurozumikyō is considered one of the earliest Shinto-derived new religions. Its founder, Kurozumi Munetada (1780-1850), was born as the third son of a senior Shinto priest (negi) at a shrine in Bizen (present-day Okayama Prefecture). From the outset,...

Kuzuryū Taisha

A This is a Shinto-derived new religion founded by Ōnishi Masajirō (1913-88). Ōnishi began his religious activities after receiving a dreamn oracle from the deity Benzaiten (Skt, Sarasvati) during a dream in 1954. With a his teaching encapsulated in the words "let us give thanks, ref...

Kyōha Shintō Rengōkai

A prewar federation of movements of sect Shinto. Its predecessor was the Shintō Dōshikai (lit: "Society of Shinto Collegues"), which was organized in 1895. When established, the Dōshikai was composed of the eight sects Kurozumikyō, Jingūkyō, Taishakyō (now known a...

Kyūseishukyō

A movement established through the merging of four branches of Sekai Kyūseikyō that had split from that organization. It began its activities in 1955 after the death of the founder of Sekai Kyūseikyō, Okada Mōkichi (1882-1955). A year before Okada's death, Maki Kinosuke (18...

Makoto no Michi

A Shinto-derived new religious movement started by Ogiwara Makoto (1910-81). Having experienced paranormal powers since before World War II, Ogiwara began participating as a psychic in a spiritualist research group in 1947. In time, Ogiwara and medical doctor Shioya Nobuo (1902-) together founded a...

Makoto no Michikyō

A religious movement founded by Matsumoto Jōtarō (September 1881-1944). Originally born into the Yamaoka family in a mountain village in Ehime Prefecture, Matsumoto began a rice business upon reaching adulthood but it proved a failure. He also tried his hand at a variety of other occupati...

Maruyamakyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Itō Rokurobei (1829-94). Born into the Kiyomiya family in Noborito village in the Tachibana district of Musashi Province (present-day Kawasaki City), Rokurobei was adopted as an heir and son-in-law by the Itō household. Thereafter he worked to revi...

Misogikyō

One of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto and frequently regarded as a Shinto-derived new religion. The religion was founded by Inoue Masakane (1790-1849), who was born in Edo (present-day Tokyo) as the son of a warrior from the feudal domain of Tatebayashi (present-day Gumma Prefecture). In 1834 ...

Mitamakyō

A Shinto-derived new religion whose founder was Nagata Fuku (1891-1975). Religiously devout from an early age, Nagata made a practice of visiting Shinto shrines, Buddhist temples and sacred mountains. After marrying she was taught a magical incantation for healing burns from her father-in-law. Coin...



« 1 (2) 3 4 5 6 »


"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
4-10-28 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-8440, Japan
URL http://21coe.kokugakuin.ac.jp/
Copyright ©2002-2006 Kokugakuin University. All rights reserved.
Ver. 1.3