Encyclopedia of Shinto Kokugakuin University
 main menu
  »New EOS site

  »Home

  »Foreword

  »Guide to Usage

  »Contributors & Translators

  

  »Movies List
 Links

Modern Sectarian Groups


« 1 2 (3) 4 5 6 »

Miyaji Shinsendō

A Shinto religious movement with strong Daoist influences, founded by Miyaji Suii (originally known as Kakiwa, 1852-1904) centered in the area of Kōchi Prefecture. The traditions of the Miyaji family state that its ancestral founder was Takekai Konomiko, fourth child of the legendary prince Ya...

Nihon Jingū Honchō

A religious movement with characteristics of sectarian Shinto (kyōha Shintō) and founded by Nakajima Shūkō (1902-88). Deeply interested in the study of the traditional calendar (rekigaku), Yin-Yang, and the theory of five phases of matter (gogyō), Nakajima had independently...

Nihon Seidō Kyōdan

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Iwasaki Shōō (1934-). In 1951 Shōō suffered from jaundice and lapsed into a coma, during which he had a mystical experience; from that time it was said he had gained the ability to experience teleportation and foretell natural calamities....

Nikkōkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion whose founder was Teraguchi Kōjirō (1881-1960). Kōjirō's life of faith began at the age of 22 after he experienced a narrow escape from death, and in March 1904 he founded the Nagao-kō (Nagao religious confraternity) on receiving a revelation f...

Ōkanmichi

A movement of the Tenrikyō lineage. In 1912, Yamada Baijirō (1875-1941), a Tenrikyō teacher fired by a sense of divine inspiration, established various Tenrikyō-derived movements such as the Tenri Kenkyūkai (Tenri Research Society) and the Tenri Sanronkō (Tenri Sanron ...

Ōmiwakyō (Sako)

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Sako Kan (1878-1937). Born in Nara prefecture, Sako was the second daughter of Murakami Kisaburō and Murakami Shiyu and it is said she exhibited spiritual powers from the age of about ten onwards. After marrying Sako Tsunezō she engaged in Shinto-r...

Ōmiwakyō(Kojima)

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Kojima Moriyoshi. It originated in 1872 within the "local academy" (shōkyōin; a small teaching center established by the government for the purpose of promulgating the "Great Teaching"; see Taikyō Senpu) at Ōmiwa Shrine in Nara Prefecture...

Ōmoto

A Shinto-derived new religion started by Deguchi Nao (1836-1918), considered its kaiso (original founder), and Deguchi Onisaburō (1871-1948), its seishi (spiritual teacher). Deguchi Nao, who was from Ayabe in Kyoto Prefecture, had a "spirit dream" at the lunar New Year in 1892, and thereafter ...

Ōmoto Hikari no Michi

A new religion established by Hōkan Meikyō (1923-) based on Ōmoto and Sekai Kyūseikyō elements. In 1952, Ikeuchi Kazuhide (1895-1971) the then-head of Sekai Kyūseikyōs Toyooka Shirogami branch claimed a visitation from the spirit of Deguchi Nao, the original fou...

Ontakekyō

One of the thirteen sects of Shinto in the prewar period. Centered on the cultic faith in Mount Ontake (ontake shinkō), it was organized as a religious sect in response to the religious policies of the early Meiji government.Emerging from the confraternity (kōsha) style of early modern re...

Ōyamanezu no Mikoto Shinji Kyōkai

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Inai Sadao (1906-88). Inai, who operated a public bathhouse in Yokohama, was diagnosed as having cancer of the throat and suffering great pain he sought, unsuccessfully, to have the cancer cured through magical healing rites performed by a religious adept. T...

Perfect Liberty Kyōdan (PL Kyōdan)

Church of Perfect Liberty. A new religion of Shinto origin. The name is frequently abbreviated as merely "PL." Its roots go back to the group Hitonomichi Kyōdan and its founder Miki Tokuharu (1871-1938). Miki had practiced as a Zen monk since he was young. He quit the Buddhist priesthood in 19...

Reiha no Hikari Kyōkai

A Shinto-derived new religious movement whose founder was Hase Yoshio (1915-84). Born in Tokyo, Hase was sent to China at the outbreak of the Sino-Japanese war, but he was repatriated after falling ill. Although he received medical treatment his condition failed to improve, and he returned to his f...

Renmonkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Shimamura Mitsu (1831-1904). Shimamura was saved from serious illness by one Yanagita Ichibei, who had studied what he called the "marvelous law of things" (myōhō no ji, an obvious reference to the "marvelous dharma (or 'law')" of the Lotus Sutra (...

Renshindō Kyōdan

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Tanaka Jigohei (1886-1973). In 1905 Tanaka entered a special course at Jingū Kōgakkan, the Shinto university at Ise, and after graduating went to Tokyo where he studied Buddhism at Tōyō University's Indian Studies Department. While still ...

Samuhara Jinja

A Shinto-derived new religious movement which began in 1935 when Tanaka Tomisaburō (1868-1967) rebuilt a dilapidated shrine in Okayama. After he had experienced a close brush with death on the frontline during the Russo-Japanese War, Tanaka felt he had received power from a talisman inscribed ...

Seichō no Ie

A Shinto-derived new religion with connections to Ōmoto. Its founder Taniguchi Masaharu (1893-1985) joined Ōmoto in 1918 and worked as an editor for its newsletter Shinreikai, but in the aftermath of the first Ōmoto incident of 1925, he left the movement and joined Asano Wasaburō...

Seikōkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Fujita Nobuhiko (1889-1977). Fujita was born in Hiroshima as the eldest son of Fujita Shizukana and Fujita Toku; his mother was said to possess paranormal powers. Fujita became a member of Shinrikyō and in due course became head of that group's Hiroshim...

Seimeikyō

A new religion deriving from Sekai Kyūseikyō. In 1955 Kihara Yoshihiko, an Ōmoto devotee from the Sekai Kyūseikyō's branch church Kōtama Daikyōkai, dissolved this group's relationship with Kyūseikyō, declared the group's independence and set up a new rel...

Seishin Myōjōkai

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Fujita Motonari (1903-85), who began to engage in independent religious activities in April 1946 after taking office as the head priest (gūji) of the In'yōseki Shrine in Fukuyama City in Hiroshima prefecture, One of Fujita's grandfathers had been a...



« 1 2 (3) 4 5 6 »


"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
4-10-28 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-8440, Japan
URL http://21coe.kokugakuin.ac.jp/
Copyright ©2002-2006 Kokugakuin University. All rights reserved.
Ver. 1.3