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Modern Sectarian Groups


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Sekai Kyūseikyō

Church of World Messianity. A Shinto-derived new religion that emerged from the Ōmoto lineage. It was founded by Okada Mokichi, the second son of a street vender from the Asakusa district in Tokyo. Okada wanted to be an artist and enrolled in the preliminary courses of an art school, but he wa...

Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyōdan

A new religion deriving from the lineages of Ōmoto and Sekai Kyūseikyō. The founder Okada Kōtama (1901-1974; original given name Yoshikazu) is known as its first generation oshienushi ("teaching master") or sukuinushi ("savior").        In 1959 Kōtama, w...

Sekai Shindōkyō

A new religion deriving from Tenrikyō and founded by Aida Hide (1898-1973). Born into a poor family in Niigata prefecture, Aida endured numerous hardships working in the spinning industry, first in Nagoya and subsequently in Takasaki and Tokyo. In 1923 her husband became ill while she also hov...

Shidaidō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Nagahashi Yasuhiko (1895-1981). Its foundation dates from 1931, when Yasuhiko met the spiritualist Matsushita Matsuzō (1873-1947) who was active at the time in Kumamoto. It is said that Yasuhiko had already experienced the gift of clairvoyance and had s...

Shin Nihon Shūkyō Dantai Rengōkai

  Federation of New Religious Organizations of Japan, a legally incorporated organization founded by and for new Japanese religious movements. Established in 1951 with a membership of twenty-four groups, the Shinshūren includes new religions derived from both Shinto and Buddhist traditions. Foll...

Shindō Tenkōkyo

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Tomokiyo Yoshizane (1888-1952). Tomokiyo joined Ōmoto in 1918 but left the next year as the result of doubts about the movement, and he developed such antipathy that he came to engage in aggressive attacks on the group. He established his own group call...

Shinji Shūmeikai

A Shinto-derived new religion strongly influenced by Sekai Kyūseikyō. Its founder, Koyama Mihoko (1910-), received Sekai Kyūseikyō's ritual of jōrei (spiritual healing and purification) while giving birth in 1940, and became a devotee of the movement the following year. She...

Shinmei Aishinkai

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Komatsu Shin'yō (1928- ). Komatsu was born in Yokohama to a mother from a lineage of hereditary Shinto priests (shake). In 1976, shortly after a friend made a prophecy that a kami was about to descend to earth, Komatsu experienced a visitation from the ...

Shinreikai Kyōdan

A Shintō-derived new religion founded by Ishii Reizan (original name Iwayoshi, 1884-58). The group's origins stem from a revelation received by Ishii in 1932. Deeply devout since childhood, Ishii had experienced mystical visitations on the occasion of his mother's illness, and had attempted to...

Shinreikyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Ōtsuka Kan'ichi (1891-72). Having displayed unusual spiritual powers from a young age, Ōtsuka inaugurated the movement on February 11, 1947, assisted by his wife Kunie (1906-). He developed a reputation for his healing powers, which were claimed to...

Shinri Jikkō no Oshie

A Shintō-derived new religion founded by Honjō Chiyoko (1902-1957). Honjō met Matsushita Matsuzō (1873-1947), a Shinto medium (reinōsha) from Kumamoto, and engaged in religious practice under his guidance. After Matsushita's death, Honjō established the legal foundatio...

Shinrikyō

One of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto, with organization typical of that period's sectarian Shinto (kyōha Shintō). Founded by Sano Tsunehiko (1834-1906), who was born in Buzen Province (present-day Fukuoka Prefecture). Sano studied kokugaku (National Learning) under Nishida Naokai, a...

Shinsei Tengan Manaita no Kai

An Ōmoto-lineage new religion founded by Kurata Chikyū (1906-91). Kurata went to China on military service and operated there for the Special Service Agency (Tokumu Kikan, a secret branch of the military). Through the relationships he developed there in the context of Sino-Japanese relati...

Shinshūkyō

One of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto, with strong characteristics of that period's sectarian Shinto (kyōha Shintō). Founded following the Meiji Restoration by Yoshimura Masamochi (1839-1915), a feudal retainer from Tsuyama Domain in Mimasaka Province (present-day Okayama Prefecture)...

Shintō Misogikyō

A Shinto-derived new religion that emerged from Misogikyō and was organized by Sakata Yasuhiro (1962-). In 1974, during the time of Misogikyōs fifth superintendent (kanchō) Sakata Yasuyoshi, the Inoue Shrine in Tokyo (dedicated to Misogikyō founder Inoue Masakane) was destroyed ...

Shintō Shinkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Unigame Ito (1876-1976). Born in Kanzaki district of Hyogo Prefecture, Unigame was devoted from an early age to venerating the kami. Since the family into which she married was affiliated with the Buddhist True Pure Land sect (Jōdō Shinshū), s...

Shintō Shinshinkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Adachi Taijūrō (1841-1895). Adachi was born in Hikami district in what is now Hyogo Prefecture. For a time he was a member of Kurozmikyō, but he received a divine revelation after nine years of engaging in his own unique form of practice, and ...

Shintō Shūseiha

One of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto. A movement typical of sectarian Shinto (kyōha Shintō), Shintō Shūseiha was founded by Nitta Kuniteru (1829-1902). Nitta was born into a warrior family in Awa (present-day Tokushima Prefecture) in Shikoku, and was active in the national...

Shintō Taikyō

One of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto (Shintō jūsanpa). Government administrative circumstances played a great role in the coming into existence of this religious organization. Before 1940, it went under the name Shintō Honkyoku (its formal name was simply "Shintō"). Shint&...

Shintō Taiseikyō

One of the thirteen sects of prewar Shintō and a typical representative of what is known as sectarian Shintō (kyōha Shintō). Founded by Hirayama Seisai (1815-1890). Born in Miharu in Mutsu Province (present-day Fukushima Prefecture), Hirayama was the son of a kendō (fencing...



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