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Modern Sectarian Groups


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Shizensha

A religious movement from the lineage of Hito no Michi Kyōdan (see PL Kyōdan) and founded by Hashimoto Satomi (1899-1984). Born in Kagoshima (Kyushu), Hashimoto became a disciple of Miki Tokuharu in 1924. Miki, in turn, had been a disciple of Kanada Tokumitsu. Miki established the Jind...

Shōroku Shintō Yamatoyama

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Tazawa Seishirō (1884-1966), and based on his personal experience of dedicating a shrine to a "mountain kami" (yama no kami) in 1919, witnessing extraordinary astronomical phenomena, and hearing divine voices. During the religion's earliest period, Tasa...

Shūkyō Hōjin Shikō Gakuen

A new religious movement strongly influenced by Shinto. Founded by Kawakami Seizan (1908-51), who was born in Tokunoshima in the Ōshima district of Kagoshima Prefecture. Kawakami became a police chief in Hyogo Prefecture, but resigned due to ill-health. During World War II, Kawakami removed to...

Shūyōdan Hōseikai

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Idei Seitarō (1899-1983). Idei was born the third son of a poor farmer in Ibaraki Prefecture. After going to Tokyo in 1915, he became acquainted with Uesaka Inosuke, a Tenrikyō preacher and co-worker at the post office where he was employed, and de...

Soshindō

A Shinto-derived new religious movement that arose focused on Matsushita Matsuzō (1873-1947), a spirit medium (reinōsha) active from the Taisho era (1912-26) to the World War II period. Subject to chronic illness, Matsushita had possessed deep faith from a young age and had actively visit...

Soshindō Kyōdan

A Shinto-derived new religion established by Yoshioka Tajūrō (1905-87), who had worked earlier as a teacher in Izumo Taishakyō. In the early Showa era (ca. late 1920s-) Yoshioka visited and came under the religious tutelage of the Shinto spiritualist Matsushita Matsuzō, known as...

Subikari Kōha Sekai Shindan

A new religion from the lineage of Ōmoto, Sekai Kyūseikyō and Mahikari. Founded by the spiritualist manga artist Kuroda Minoru (1928- ), under influence from Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyōdan. Kuroda made his living as an artist of manga (graphic novels) while continuing his studies ...

Sukui no Hikari Kyōdan

A new religion deriving from Sekai Kyūseikyō, and one of several groups that in quick succession became independent in opposition to that religion's policy of centralization (ichigenka) implemented in the mid-1960s. Its direct parent body was Shinsei Kyōkai, which had been one of Sek...

Sūkyō Mahikari

A new religion derived from the lineages of Ōmoto and Sekai Kyūseikyō, and which became independent from the Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyōdan. When the founder of Sekai Mahikari Bunmei Kyōdan, Okada Kōtama (1901-74) (known in the movement as sukuinushi, or lit., "salvation...

Sumerakyō

A Shinto-derived new religion considered in the Shirakawa Shintō lineage. It began when Onikura Taruhiko, who had received direct transmission from the Shirakawa family of Shinto ritualists (called the Shirakawa Hakuō), experienced possession (kamigakari) by a deity around 1919. At the ti...

Taireidō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Tanaka Morihei (1884-1928). Tanaka is said to have acquired a kind of supranormal power akin to an "ectenic force" (reishiryoku) as the result of a four-months long ascetic seclusion in the mountains, together with fasting he performed during that time. In 1...

Taiwa Kyōdan

A Shinto-derived new religious movement. It emerged from Yamatokyō, a movement founded by Hozumi Kenkō (1913-76) and his wife Hisako (1908-2003), when the latter movement's Sendai branch, headed by Hisako, went independent. Hozumi Hisako had been subject to chronic illness since childhood...

Tamamitsu Jinja

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by the spirit medium Motoyama Kinue (1909-74). In 1932 Kinue attempted suicide out of depression, flinging herself off a precipice on the island of Shōdoshima. A sudden gust of wind, however, blew her back onto the cliff, and just then she heard the words ...

Ten'onkyo

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Hachiro Fukuji (1899-1962). On the occasion of the one-hundredth-day memorial following his eldest daughter's death in 1931, Hachiro experienced the ability to converse with her spirit, and thereafter received visitations from various deities. From that time...

Tenchikyō

The founder of this group, Uozumi Masanobu (1852-1928), was born into the Maruo family, a farming family in Hyogo Prefecture. He became a household servant in Kobe, but he became seriously ill, and was healed by Shirakami Shin'ichirō (the first-generation person of that name), who was a senior...

Tengenkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Naniwa Hisakazu (1902-84). Hisakazu was born as the second son of Ishii Hanjirō and his wife Miwa in the Kashima district of Okayama Prefecture, but at the age of nine he took on the surname of his mother's family. After graduating from high school he w...

Tenjōkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Ishiguro Jō (1908- ), known within the movement as Mahashira (True Pillar). Ishiguro was born in Sayō-machi in Hyogo Prefecture, the second son of Ishiguro Yasujirō and Ishiguro Suwa. It is said that at the age of 17 he was so stricken with pu...

Tenjōkyō Hon'in

A Shinto-derived new religion whose founder was Kuramoto Ito (1895-1985). Ito was born in Hōfu City, Yamaguchi Prefecture, but stayed at the home of relatives in Saga while attending a girls' school there. Due to various family misfortunes, however, she returned to her family home. She later m...

Tenkōkyō

A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Fujita Shinshō (?- 1966). Fujita was born into a farming family in Uma district in Ehime Prefecture, and at the age of nineteen received a revelation from a deity he called Tenchikane no kami ("heaven-earth gold deity," simultaneously known as the centr...

Tenrikyō

Together with being one of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto, Tenrikyō was Japan's largest new religion from Meiji era until Japan's defeat in World War II (1945). In the tenth lunar month of 1863 Nakayama Miki (1798-1887) had a sudden experience of spirit possession (kamigakari), and this e...



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