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Matsuoka Yūen

  Proponent of Suika Shintō of the mid-Edo period. The characters of his given name are also read as Obuchi. His style was Chūryō, and his formal names were Fumio, Sadanao, and Yūen. He had the common names Ryōan and others, and went by numerous epistolary names, including Ry...

Mikannagi Kiyonao

  Shinto priest (shinshoku) and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) from the late Tokugawa period to the Meiji era. His common names were Shizuma and Shōsho, and he had the epistolary name of Bōen. Born on the fifteenth day of the second month of 1812 in the town of Yamada, Ise Province...

Miyaji Izuo

  Shintoist of the modern period. Born in the eighth month of 1847 in Kōchi, Tosa Province (present-day Kōchi Prefecture in Shikoku), Miyaji's original lineage name was Temasu, but he became the adopted son of Miyaji Mine. In 1872 he was conferred the Eleventh Rank in the Ministry of Religi...

Miyaji Naokazu

  Shinto historian. Born in January 1886 in the town of Enokuchi in Kōchi Prefecture, as the eldest son of Miyaji Naochika. Naokazu graduated from Tokyo Imperial University, where his senior thesis was entitled Hachimangū no kenkyū (Research on the Shrine Hachimangū). Naokazu was ...

Motoda Nagazane

  Confucian scholar of the late Edo period and early Meiji era and lecturer to the Emperor Meiji. He had the style name Shichū and epistolary names Higashino and Chayō. Born in 1818 in Higo Province (present-day Kumamoto Prefecture) as the eldest son of a retainer to the Kumamoto domain. He...

Motoori Haruniwa

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. His common name was Kenzō, later Kentei, and he had the epistolary name Nochisuzunoya. The eldest son of Motoori Norinaga, he was born in 1763 in his mother's birthplace, the city of Tsu in Ano District, Ise Province (present-day ...

Motoori Norinaga

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. His original lineage name was Ozu, and he was known initially by the names Yoshisada and Yashirō. After he took the family name Motoori, he was known as Norinaga, Shun'an and Chūe. His epistolary name was Suzunoya. Born in 17...

Motoori Ōhira

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the early modern period. His original lineage name was Inagake and his formal name was Shigeho, but he later took the name Ōhira. He was called Sōshiemon after he was adopted into the Motoori house, and his epistolary name was Fujinokakitsu. Born...

Mozume Takami

         Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) and the Japanese language from the Meiji to the Taisho eras. Born on the twenty-eighth day of the fifth month of 1847 in the castle town of Kitsuki in the province of Bungo, in what is now Kitsuki City, Oita Prefecture. His father w...

Mozume Takayo

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) from the late Edo period to the early Meiji era. Born on the first day of the second month of 1817 in the castle town of Kitsuki in Bungo Province (now Kitsuki City, Oita Prefecture), Mozume had the epistolary name Muguraya. A dedicated student from childhood...

Murata Harumi

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the mid-Edo period, and disciple of Kamo no Mabuchi. Born the second son of Murata Harumichi, a dried sardine merchant in the Nihonbashi district of Edo, his original lineage name was Taira. His common names were Heishirō, Jihei, and Denzō, his s...

Mutobe Yoshika

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the Hirata school in the late Edo period. Born in 1806 as the son of Mutobe Tokika, a Shinto priest (shikan) of the shrine Mukō Jinja in Otokuni District, Yamashiro Province, in what is now Kyoto Prefecture. In 1823, at the age of eighteen, Mutobe bec...

Nakae Tōju

  Confucian scholar of the early Edo period. His style was Korenaga, his formal name was Gen, and his common name was Yoemon. Born in Takashima District in Ōmi Province (present-day Takashima District, Shiga Prefecture), Nakae was later called the Sage of Ōmi (Ōmi seijin) because of hi...

Nakanishi Naokata

  A scholar of the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū) from the early Edo period. His childhood name was Tsunetame; later, he adopted the names Shōshin and Naokata, and used the epistolary name Ramōshi. He studied under Deguchi Nobuyoshi (1615-90), but in 1670 became involved in a legal d...

Nakanishi Nobuyoshi

  An Ise scholar from the early Edo period. Born in Yamada, the town at the gate of the Outer Shrine (Gekū) of the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū), Nakanishi served there as a kujō ōuchindo (Senior Ritual Assistant). His childhood name was Nobuyoshi, using different characters, w...

Nakayama Miki

  Founder of the religious group Tenrikyō. Called Oyasama ("Beloved Parent") within Tenrikyō, Nakayama was born in Sanmaiden Village, Yamanobe District in Yamato Province (present-day Nara Prefecture) on the eighteenth day of the fourth month 1798, as the eldest daughter of Maegawa Masanobu...

Nakayama Tadayasu

  Courtier and proponent of imperial restoration (ōsei fukko) during the late Edo period. Nakayama Tadayasu was father of Nakayama Yoshiko (1835-1907), the mother of Emperor Meiji. He was born in 1809 as the second son of Provisional Grand Councilor Nakayama Tadayori. Appointed Provisional Major...

Nashiki Sukeyuki

  A proponent of Suika Shintō of the mid-Edo period. His epistolary name was Keisai, his posthumous name was Zenju'in, and his common name was Sakyo Gondayū; he also occasionally used the lineage name Kamo. Born to the courtier Nashiki Sukenaga, who had been bestowed with the Junior Third R...

Ninomiya Sontoku

  Agronomist and theorist of the late Edo period. Born in the seventh month of 1787 in the village of Kayama in Ashigarakami District, Sagami Province (present-day Odawara City, Kanagawa Prefecture) to a peasant family. His formal name was Kinjirō, though after he was employed by the Tokugawa go...

Nishida Naokai

  A scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. Born as the fourth child of Takahashi Motoyoshi, a retainer of Kokura Domain (in present-day Fukuoka Prefecture), he was adopted by Nishida Naoaki. His childhood name was Shōzaburō, and his epistolary name was Kōnen. A...



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