Encyclopedia of Shinto Kokugakuin University
 main menu
  »New EOS site

  »Home

  »Foreword

  »Guide to Usage

  »Contributors & Translators

  

  »Movies List
 Links

Personalities


« 1 ... 4 5 6 (7) 8 9 10 »

Nitta Kuniteru

  Founder of the Shinto sect Shintō Shūseiha. His original name was Takezawa Kenzaburō. Born on the fifth day of the second month of 1829 in Tokushima Domain of Awa Province (present-day Tokushima Prefecture), Nitta was third son of samurai father Takezawa Hishiyō and mother Some....

Ōgimachi Kinmichi

  An advocate of Suika Shintō of the mid-Edo era, born on the twenty-sixth day of the sixth month of 1653 as the last child of Ōgimachi Takatoyo, Provisional Major Councilor (gon-dainagon, a high court official). Kinmichi used the epistolary names Fūsuiō and Fūsuiken, and was...

Ōishigori Masumi

  Practitioner of genreigaku, or investigation of the spirit-power of words (kotodama). His lineage name was Mochizuki, and he had the childhood name of Haruo, then was given the name Daisuke Kōmu after his coming of age. Born in the eleventh month of 1833 in Ueno in Iga Province (in present-day...

Oka Kumaomi

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) and Shinto priest of the late Edo period. Born on the ninth day of the third month of 1783 in the village of Kibemura, Kanoashi District in the province of Iwami (present-day Shimane Prefecture). Kumaomi was the illegitimate child of Oka Tadahide, a member of...

Ōkuni Takamasa

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) and advocate of a form of Japanese nativism called Honkyō hongaku in the late Edo and early Meiji periods. Eldest son of Imai Hideka, samurai retainer of the Tsuwano Domain in Iwami Province (in present-day Shimane Prefecture), Ōkuni was born in the...

Orikuchi Shinobu

  Scholar of folklore, Japanese literature and Shinto. As a poet, he wrote under the name Shaku Chōkū. Born February 11, 1887, to a merchant family in Kizumura Village, Nishinari District, Osaka, Orikuchi graduated in 1910 from Kokugakuin University. He worked for a while as a part-time tea...

Ōtori Sessō

  Second-generation Superintendent (kanchō) of Ontake-kyō, one of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto. Born on the first day of the first month of 1814 in Innoshima, Bingo Province (present-day Hiroshima Prefecture). Originally a Buddhist monk-priest of the Sōtō Zen sect, he serve...

Ōyama Tameoki

  Proponent of Suika Shintō during the mid-Edo period. Born in 1651 in Ii District, Yamashiro Province (present-day Fukushima Prefecture) as the third son of Matsumoto Tameyoshi, priest (kannnushi) at the shrine Inari Jinja in Fushimi, Kyoto. At the age of three, Tameoki was adopted by Ōyam...

Saeki Ariyoshi

  Historian from the Meiji to the Showa eras. Born in the ninth month of 1867 in Nakaniikawa District, Toyama Prefecture, to the priest Saeki Arihisa of the shrine Oyama Jinja in Toyama's Tateyama region. Ariyoshi moved to Tokyo in 1882 and graduated from the Research Institute for the Japanese Class...

Sano Tsunehiko

  Founder of the Shinto sect Shinrikyō. Born as the eldest son of Sano Tsunekatsu on the sixteenth day of the second month of 1834 in the town of Tokuriki in Buzen Province's Kiku District (present-day Kitakyūshū City, Fukuoka Prefecture). He studied National Learning (kokugaku) in his...

Satō Nobuhiro

  Scholar of economics in the late Edo period. His style was Genkai, his common name was Momosuke, and he used numerous epistolary names, including Chinen, Shōan and Yūsai. Born in 1769 as the eldest son of Satō Nobutaka, a physician in Okachi District, Dewa Province (an area on the bo...

Sawatari Hiromori

  Shinto priest and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) in the late Edo and early Meiji periods. Son of Sawatari Moriaki, a Shinto priest (kannushi) at the shrine Rokusho no Miya (presently Ōkunitama Jinja) in Fuchū, Musashi Province (present-day Fuchū City, Tokyo). In 1835, he fol...

Senge Takatomi

  Religious practitioner and politician of the Meiji and Taisho eras. Avowed eightieth-generation descendent of the "divine" governor-kami of Izumo (Izumo kokusō); chief priest (gūji) at the shrine Izumo Taisha; and first leader of the Shinto sect Izumo Ōyashirokyō.     ...

Senge Toshizane

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. Common name Kiyonushi, with epistolary names Kisai and Umenoya, among others. Senge was born on the sixteenth day of the first month of 1764 as the third son of Toshikatsu, the seventy-fifth generation Izumo kokusō, chief governor...

Shikida Toshiharu

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo and Meiji periods. Born on the twentieth day of the seventh month of 1817 in the village of Shikida in Buzen Province's Usa District (present-day Usa City, Oita Prefecture), he was the second son of the Shinto priest Miyamoto Kanetsugu of the ...

Shishino Nakaba

  Founder of Fusōkyō, one of the thirteen Meiji-era groups of so-called "sectarian Shinto" (Kyōha Shintō). Born on the ninth day of the ninth month (lunar) of 1844 in the town of Kumanojō (located in the Satsuma domains Satsuma District, present-day city of Sendai, Kagoshim...

Sonoda Moriyoshi

  Scholar of the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū) in the late Edo period, born to the Arakida lineage. Son of Sonoda Moritsura (1757-1812), Suppliant Priest (negi) at Ise's Inner Shrine (Naikū), Sonoda Moriyoshi was born in 1785 as the younger twin of Moritsune. His childhood name was Okino...

Sugiura Jūgō

  Educator and philosopher of the Meiji and Taisho eras. Born in 1855 as the second son of Confucianist Sugiura Jūbun in the Zeze Domain of Ōmi Province (in present-day Shiga Prefecture). His styled was Tendai Dōshi. As a youth, he received training in Chinese classics at the Jungid...

Suzuka Tsuratane

  Shinto practitioner and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) in the late Edo period. Born in 1795 to a priestly family (shake) of the Kyoto shrine Yoshida Jinja. The Suzuka were hereditary family retainers to the Yoshida clan. Suzuka held the posts of Provisional Junior Undersecretary for Kami A...

Suzuki Shigetane

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) in the lage Edo era. His common names included Katsuzaemon, and his styles included Kashinoya and Izukashi. Shigetani was his formal name. He was born in 1812 in the village of Nii, Tsuna District, Awaji Province (present-day Hyōgo Prefecture) to the hou...



« 1 ... 4 5 6 (7) 8 9 10 »


"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
4-10-28 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-8440, Japan
URL http://21coe.kokugakuin.ac.jp/
Copyright ©2002-2006 Kokugakuin University. All rights reserved.
Ver. 1.3