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Tachibana Mitsuyoshi

  Shintoist of the early Edo period. His formal name was Mitsuyoshi, written or Ϳ, and he used the epistolary name Ishōan and others. He was given the Shinto religious name (reishagō) Jureishin by the Yoshida house.         Tachibana was born in 1635, in Hirad...

Tachibana Moribe

  A scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period, whose common name was Motosuke and epistolary names included Hōko, Chian, Shiigamoto, and others. Tachibana was born as the eldest son of the Iida family in Komuku Village, Asake District, , Ise Province (present-day Mie Prefect...

Tada Yoshitoshi

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku); antiquarian scholar and author of Floating World Tales (Ukiyo zōshi) of the mid-Edo period. According to general belief, he was born in 1698, but 1694, 1695, 1696 are all possible years for his birth. Tada's original lineage name was Minamoto, with othe...

Takenouchi Shikibu

  Proponent of Suika Shintō in the mid-Edo period. His formal name was Takamochi, and he used the epistolary names Shūan and Seian. He was born in Niigata, Kanbara District of Echigo Province (present-day Niigata Prefecture) in 1712, in a hereditary physician's household. At the age sevente...

Takeshiuchi no Sukune

  Also written with the Chinese characters ǩ, and sometimes read Takenouchi no Sukune. A legendary personality called one of the three meritorious subjects at the time of the Punitive Campaign against the Three Korean Kingdoms, and regarded as the ancestor of twenty-eight clans including Ki, K...

Tamaki Masahide

  A Shintoist of the mid-Edo period, born on the seventh day of the twelfth month of 1670. A priest (shinkan) at the shrine Ume no Miya Taisha in Kyoto, Tamaki had the common names Kōsuke and Hyōgo, and his epistolary names included Isai and others. His posthumous "divine title" (reishag...

Tamamatsu Misao

  A scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) from the end of the Edo into the early Meiji periods. Born in 1810 as the second son of Yamamoto Kimihiro, a State Consultant (sangi) and Chamberlain (jijū). At the age of eight, Tamamatsu entered Buddhism at the Muryōin temple of the monastery Da...

Tanaka Yoritsune

  A scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo and early Meiji periods. He was born in 1836 as the son of Tanaka Shirōzaemon, a retainer of Satsuma Domain (in present-day Kagoshima Prefecture). At the age of fifteen he was implicated in a political dispute and was exiled to the isla...

Tanaka Yoshitō

  A Shinto scholar, D.Lit. Born on the twelfth day of the ninth month of 1872, in Yonegawa Village of Kuka District, Yamaguchi Prefecture. Immediately after graduation from the Department of Philosophy at Tokyo Imperial University in 1903, Tanaka became a Lecturer at Kokugakuin Academy (later Kokugak...

Tani Shigetō

  Shintoist of the Suika Shintō lineage and Confucian scholar of the mid-Edo period. He originated from the Miwa clan, his common name was Tanzaburō, and he used the epistolary name Jinzan. He was born as the third son of Tani Kanbei Shigemoto, priest (shinshoku) of the shrine Hachimang$...

Tanigawa Kotosuga

  A scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) in the mid-Edo period. Tanigawa's style name was Kōsuke, his formal name was Noboru, and he had the common name of Yōjun. He used numerous epistolary names (gō) including Tansai and others. He was born in 1709 as the eldest son of a physician...

Tanimori Yoshiomi

  A scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) during the late Edo and Meiji periods. Born in Kyoto in 1817, Tanimori became a disciple of Ban Nobutomo (1775-1848) and studied positivistic historical research (or "evidential learning," kōshōgaku), concentrating in particular on the investigati...

Tenkai

  A Tendai Buddhist Monk of the Azuchi-Momoyama and early Edo periods, known as the founder of Sannō Ichijitsu Shintō.         Tenkai came from Takada, Aizu (in present-day Fukushima Prefecture); several theories concerning his date of birth exist. His epistolary name wa...

Tokoyo Nagatane

  An early Meiji-era scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the Hirata school. Born in 1832, Tokoyo lived in Mibu, Tsuga District, Shimotsuke Province (present-day Mibu-chō, Tochigi Prefecture). He name was first Tokozumi Keikichi, but he later changed it to Tokoyo Nagatane. He became a post...

Tokugawa Mitsukuni

  Second-generation domainal lord of Mito Domain in the early Edo period. His childhood name was Chōmaru, then Chiyomatsu, and his styles were Tokuaki, Kanshi, and Shiryū. He used Nisshinsai and other studio names, and his posthumous title was Gikō. He was appointed Vice Middle Council...

Tokugawa Yoshinao

  Lord of Kōfu Domain (in present-day Yamanashi Prefecture)and Owari Nagoya Domain (in Aichi Prefecture) in the early Edo period. His style was Shikei, and his posthumous name was Genkei. He was born as the fifth son of Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1600, and spent his childhood in Suruga Province (present...

Tomobe Yasutaka

  A scholar of Suika Shintō of the mid-Edo period. His common name was Buemon, and his epistolary names were Shiansai and Yaegaki no Okina. Born at Shinagawa in Edo on the first day of the twelfth month of 1667, Tomobe began studying Neo-Confucianism under Satō Naokata (1650-1719). He then ...

Tomokiyo Yoshisane

Founder of Shintō Tenkōkyo. His original name was Kyūgo, and epistolary names included Tenkō, Mokusan, Joyō, and Banzan. Tomokiyo was born on October 9, 1888, in what is today Yamaguchi City, and reports state that at the age of eleven, he had the experience of kamikakushi,...

Tsuchimikado Yasutomi

  Scholar of the way of Yin-Yang (onmyō), and Shintoist of the mid-Edo period, who formulated and integrated Tsuchimikado Shintō. He is generally thought to have been born on the twentieth day of the sixth month, 1655, but one theory holds that he was actually born on the eighteenth day of ...

Tsunoda Tadayuki

  Chief Priest (gūji) of the shrine Atsuta Jingū. His common name was Yoshisaburō, and he used the epistolary names (gō) Ibukinoya and Shizumenoiwamuro, among others. He was born on the sixth day of the eleventh month, 1834, in Iwamurata, Kita Saku District, Shinano Province (pres...



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