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Tsurumine Shigenobu

  Shinto intellectual and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. Tsurumine was born in 1786 as the son of Tsurumine Nobutsuna, priest of Yasaka Shrine in Usuki, Bungo Province (present-day Oita Prefecture), and showed a keen interest in the study of Japanese and Chinese class...

Ueda Kazutoshi

  Scholar of Japanese language of the Meiji and Showa eras. Born the first month of 1867 in the Edo residence of the lord of Nagoya Domain. Graduated in 1888 from Imperial University (now the University of Tokyo) Department of Literature in Japanese literature, and entered the university's graduate s...

Uematsu Arinobu

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) in the late Edo period. Common name Chūhei. Uematsu was born 1758 in Nagoya in the Owari Domain (in present-day Aichi Prefecture). His father was a rōnin (masterless samurai), a former retainer of the Owari Domain who operated a woodcut printing sho...

Urabe Kanekata

  Scholar of the mid-Kamakura era. Also known as Kaiken. Son of Kanafumi, of the Hirano branch of the Urabe clan, who held the office of jingi taifu in the Department of Divinities (Jingikan). Originally, the Urabe clan had charge of the practice of plastromancy, (kiboku), a form of divination using ...

Urata Nagatami

  Shinto scholar of the Meiji era. Born on the first day of the third month of 1840 in the town of Uji in Watarai District of the province of Ise. His style name was Kokufu and he used the epistolary name Kaitei. In 1857, Urata inherited his family's hereditary positions of Naikū gon-negi (Provi...

Wakabayashi Kyōsai

  A scholar of Suika Shintō and Confucianism in the mid-Edo period. Born in Kyoto in 1679, his style name was Shiin, his formal names were Masayoshi and Yukiyasu, and his epistolary names included Kyōsai, Bōnanken, and Hikei.         A student of Asami Keisai, Wakab...

Watanabe Ikarimaru

  A Shinto priest (shinkan) and scholar of National Studies (kokugaku) active from the end of the Tokugawa regime through the Meiji era. His formal name was initially named Shigetō, but later changed to Ikarimaru. His common names included Yokichirō and Tetsujirō, and his epistolary na...

Watarai Ieyuki

  A scholar of Ise Shintō during the Nanbokuchō period (ca. 1336-1392). Born as the first son of the Outer Shrine (Gekū) Suppliant Priest (negi) Muramatsu Ariyuki, Watarai began his career as a negi in 1306 and at the age of eighty-six reached the position of First Negi of the Outer Sh...

Watarai Tsuneyoshi

  A scholar of Ise Shintō during the late Kamakura and Nanbokuchō periods. Born as the second son of Higaki Sadanao, the First Suppliant (ichi no negi), also called the Superintendent or chōkan) of the Outer Shrine (Gekū) at the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū). His initial n...

Watarai Yukitada

  A scholar of Ise Shintō of the late Kamakura period. His father was Nishikawara Yukitsugu, but he was raised by his grandfather, Yukiyoshi. Watarai Yukitada was appointed as Suppliant Priest (negi) of the Outer Shrine (Gekū) at the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū) in 1251. The apex o...

Yamada Akiyoshi

  A patriot (shishi) of the Restoration period and a Meiji military man and politician. Born in 1844 in present-day Yamaguchi Prefecture's Hagi City as the son of a retainer of the Chōshū Domain. His childhood name was Ichinojō and his epistolary name was Kūsai. He studied at the ...

Yamada Yoshio

  A scholar of Japanese philology and literature who was active from the later Meiji through the Shōwa eras. Born in Toyama Prefecture on May 10, 1873, Yamada dropped out of Toyama's ordinary middle school, then passed the teacher's license examination for elementary and middle school teaching t...

Yamaga Sokō

  An early Edo-period scholar of Confucianism and Military Science. His formal name was Takasuke, his style was Shikei, and he had the epistolary names Sokō and Inzan. Born in 1622 in Aizu Wakamatsu, he began his study of the Neo-Confucian Zhuxi under Hayashi Razan at the age of nine, and from t...

Yamaguchi Okinari

  A Meiji-era scholar of the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū). His childhood name was Tanekichi, his common name was Denbee, later changed to Okinari, and his epistolary names were Tōen and Shunpo. He was born in the Watarai District of Ise Province (present-day Mii Prefecture) on the eight...

Yamamoto Nobuki

  A scholar of modern Shintō history and D.Lit (bungaku hakushi). Born in 1873 to a family of hereditary Shintō priests (shinshoku) at Tachima village, Kita-Uwa District, Ehime Prefecture, he became a follower of the Shinto sect Konkōkyō. In 1895 he graduated from Kokugakuin Unive...

Yamazaki Ansai

  An early Edo-period scholar of Confucianism and Shinto. His style was Moriyoshi, his common name was Kaemon, and his epistolary name was Ansai. His posthumous "spirit-shrine" name (reisha-gō) was Suika. Born in Kyoto on the ninth day of the twelfth month in the first year of the Genna era (Jan...

Yanagita Kunio

  Founder of modern Japanese folklore studies. Born on July 31, 1875 to the Matsuoka family in Tsujikawa, Tawara Village, Jintō District, Hyōgō Prefecture, the sixth of eight brothers and sisters. His father Matsuoka Misao (otherwise known as Yakusai) was a proponent of National Learni...

Yano Harumichi

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the Hirata Atsutane school in the late Edo period and early Meiji era. Born the eldest son of Yano Michimasa, retainer of Iyo Ōzu Domain (in present-day Ehime Prefecture), Yano was an eager student from childhood. In 1845, he traveled to the Higashiya...

Yashiro Hirokata

  Tokugawa shogunal retainer and scholar of Japanese studies of the late Edo period. His common name was Tarō, his formal name was Akikata (which he later changed to Akitora and Take), and he had the epistolary name Rinchi. He was born in 1758 in Edo as the son of Tokugawa retainer Yashiro Yoshi...

Yoshida Kanemi

  Head of Yoshida Shintō in the Azuchi-Momoyama period (ca. 1574-1600). Born in 1535 as the eldest son of Yoshida Kanemigi, he was also the older brother of Bonshun. He was at first called Kaneyasu, but later changed his name to Kanemi. In his career at court, he reached the ceremonial posts of ...



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