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Deguchi Nobuyoshi

  A priest (shinkan) of the Outer Shrine (Gekū) at the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū) in the mid-Edo period. His original clan name was Watarai, he had the common names Yosanjirō, Shinano, and Gudayū, and his epistolary names were Chokuan and Kōkodō. His formal name wa...

Deguchi Onisaburō

  Systematizer and co-founder of the new religion Ōmoto. Known within the group as Seishi (Holy Teacher), he was born July 12, 1871, in Anao village in the Kuwada district of Tamba Province (present-day Kyoto Prefecture), as the eldest son of Ueda Kichimatsu and his wife Yone. As a boy, Deguchi ...

En no Ozunu

  A thaumaturge thought to have lived on Mount Katsuragi (or Kazuraki) in Yamato Province in the second half of the seventh century and later known as the founder of Shugendō. Also known also as En no Ubasoku (En the upasaka [a Buddhist acolyte]) and En no Gyōja (En the ascetic), he was con...

Fujii Takanao

  Shinto priest (shikan) and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. Known commonly as Ozen, he went by the epistolary names Matsunoya and Shōsai. Born in Miyauchi, Kayō District, Bitchū Province (present-day Okayama Prefecture) in 1764, Takanao's father Fujii T...

Fujitani Mitsue

  Scholar of the Japanese language of the late Edo period. Born in Kyoto, where he was a resident, Fujitani was the son of Fujitani Nariakira. His common names included Gengo and Sen'eimon, his formal names were Narihisa, Narimoto, and Mitsue, and his epistolary names included Kitanobe, Kitano and Sa...

Fujitani Nariakira

  Scholar of the Japanese language in the mid-Edo period. Born in 1738 in Kyoto to Minagawa Shundō, an avid amateur scholar of the merchant class; his elder brother was the famed Confucianist Minagawa Kien (1734-1807). His common name was Sen'uemon, his style was Chūtatsu, and he used numer...

Fukuba Bisei (Yoshishizu)

  Scholar of National Learning (Kokugaku) of the late Edo and early Meiji eras. Born in 1831 as the son of Fukuba Yoshitada, a samurai retainer of the Tsuwano Domain (in present-day Shimane Prefecture). Fukuba specialized in the study of kokugaku as a student at the Yōrōkan domainal academy...

Furukawa Mitsura

  Shinto priest (shinshoku) and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo) period and early Meiji era. His common names were Sohei, Shōsaku, and Mino no Kami, and he used the epistolary name Kyūkodō. Born in Edo in 1810, he was a disciple of Hirata Kanetane. During the la...

Godaiin Mahashira

  Born 1705 in Kagoshima as the son of a scholar of National Learning (kokugaku), he interacted with Kagoshima domain kokugaku scholars Shirao Kunihashira and Hatta Tomonori, and in 1839 became a disciple of Hirata Atsutane in Edo. In 1841, the low-ranking kobankaku samurai Godaiin Ryōji adopted...

Gonda Naosuke

  Late-Tokugawa and early Meiji-era scholar of Hirata Atsutane's school of National Learning (kokugaku). Born in 1809 in Iruma District in the province of Musashi (present-day Saitama Prefecture) as the son of physician Gonda Naonori. At the age of nineteen, Naosuke moved to Edo where he studied medi...

Haga Yaichi

  Scholar of Japanese literature in the Meiji and Taisho eras, born on the fourteenth day of the fifth month of 1867 in the castle town of Fukui. Haga's father Masaki had studied National Learning (kokugaku) under Hirata Kanetane and Japanese poetry (waka) with Tachibana Akemi, and had served in the ...

Hagiwara Kaneyori

  (The characters of his given name can also be read Kanetsugu.) A proponent of Yoshida Shintō in the early Edo period. Born in 1588 as the eldest son of Yoshida Kaneharu, then Superintendant of Divinities (jingi kanryō, the highest ranking priest in Yoshida Shintō). At the age of nine...

Hanawa Hokiichi

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the mid-Edo period. Born on the fifth day of the fifth month of 1746 to a peasant family in the village of Hokino in Musashi Province (present-day Kodama Town, Saitama Prefecture). His lineage name was Hagino, and he had the styles Toranosuke and Hokiichi,...

Hasegawa Kakugyō

  Practitioner of Fuji shinkō, the devotional cult to Mount Fuji, who lived during the Azuchi-Momoyama into the early Edo periods. He is claimed as the original founder of the practices of the confraternity Fujikō and religious sects Fusōkyō and Jikkōkyō. His childhood n...

Hatano Takao

  Member of the Shinto priesthood (shinshoku) and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo and early Meiji periods, Hatano used the epistolary names Sakaki, Eijuen and Hitachi, among others. Born 1798 in the village of Nishigata in Hoi District, Mikawa Province (now Mito, Aichi Prefect...

Hattori Nakatsune

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. Born to a family who were members of the police force (yoriki) in the town of Matsusaka in Ise (present-day Mie Prefecture). His common name was Ginai, and he went by the epistolary name Suigetsu.        In 1785, at...

Hayashi Ōen

  Imperial loyalist and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. Born on the twenty-eighth day of the tenth month of 1797 as the third son of Hayashi Mataemon Michihide, samurai retainer of the Kumamoto Domain, in the Kumamoto castle town of Yamazaki (present-day Kumamoto Prefe...

Hayashi Razan

  Confucian scholar of the early Edo period. His formal names included Nobukatsu, and he had the style Shishin (written with two different sets of Sino-Japanese characters), together with Radō and other epistolary names. His common names included Dōshun, and he was given the posthumous spir...

Hirata Atsutane

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. He had numerous epistolary names, including Daigaku and Ibukinoya, and together with Kada no Azumamaro, Kamo no Mabuchi, and Motoori Norinaga, he is numbered as one of the "four great kokugaku scholars" (kokugaku yondaijin).   &nb...

Hirata Kanetane

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo and early Meiji eras. Born in 1799 in Niiya, Iyo Province (present-day Ehime Prefecture), Hirata's original lineage name was Midorigawa. In 1824 he married Hirata Atsutane's daughter Chie and subsequently became the great scholar's adopted son...



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