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Hirayama Seisai

  Founder of the Shinto sect Shintō Taiseikyō and first Superintendent (kanchō) of Ontakekyō. He was born in 1815 as the second son of Kurooka Katsuensai, domainal instructor in swordsmanship (kendō) for the Miharu Domain (in present-day Fukushima Prefecture). At the age of t...

Honaga Mosuke

  A Shinto scholar (D.Lit) active in the late Meiji and early Showa eras. Born June 20, 1881, in the village of Ōsaki in Atsumi District, Aichi Prefecture, as the eldest son of Honaga Tokutarō and mother Matsu.        After graduating from the First Higher School, Honaga...

Hori Hidenari

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) from the period before the Meiji Restoration to the early Meiji era. He also had the alias Shigetari, and the common names Yazaemon and Naiki, and had the epistolary names Kotonoya and Taruhonoya. The son of Hori Shigeto-o, a retainer of Koga Domain (in prese...

Hoshina Masayuki

  Domainal lord of Aizu (in present-day Fukushima Prefecture) in the early Edo period. His common names were Kōmatsumaru and Higo no Kami, and his posthumous name was Hanitsu Reishin. Born on the seventh day of the fifth month of 1611 as the fourth son of second Tokugawa Shōgun Hidetada (15...

Ichijō Kaneyoshi

  Courtier and scholar of the mid-Muromachi period (ca. mid-fourteenth to late-sixteenth centuries). Epistolary names included Tōka Rōjin, Sankan Rōjin and Tōzai, while his common name was Kanera.       Ichijō was born on the twenty-seventh day of the fift...

Iida Takesato

  A scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) and follower of the teachings of Hirata Atsutane (1176-1843). Iida was born on the sixth day of the twelfth month of 1827 in the Edo residence of the lord of Shinano Takashima Domain (of the Suwa clan, holders of 30,000 koku, part of present-day Nagano Pref...

Ikeda Mitsumasa

  Early Edo-period lord of Okayama Domain in Bizen Province (present-day Okayama Prefecture). Common name Shintarō, and posthumous title Hōrekkō. Born in 1609 to Ikeda Toshitaka (1584-1616), the previous lord of Okayama Domain. Mitsumasa inherited the title of daimyō (domainal lor...

Ikuta Yorozu

  Kokugaku (National Learning) scholar of the late Edo period. Born in 1801 to Ikuta Nobukatsu, samurai retainer of Tatebayashi Domain in Kōzuke Province (present-day Gunma Prefecture). His formal name was Kuniho (or Kunihide), and he used the epistolary name Daichū Dōjin. Other names ...

Imaizumi Sadasuke

  Educator and Shintoist of the Meiji, Taisho and Showa periods. Born on the ninth day of the second month of 1863 in Sendai Domain (present-day Miyagi Prefecture), third son of Imaizumi Tsutayoshi, vassal of the chief retainer Katakura clan. In 1874, at the bequest of his former feudal leader Kataku...

Inaba Masakuni

  First superintendent (kanchō) of Shintō Honkyoku, one of the thirteen sects of prewar Shinto (Shintō jūsanpa) and a Viscount (shishaku) in the modern system of Japanese court ranks. Born on the twenty-sixth day of the fifth month of 1834 as the second son of Niwa Nagatomi, lord ...

Inbe no Hironari

  Court functionary of the early Heian period. Apart from being listed in the Nihon kōki as having been conferred the Lower Junior Fifth court rank on the seventeenth day of the eleventh month of 808, he is absent from the written record. He changed his family name to a variant on the characters...

Inbe no Masamichi

  Shintoist of the Muromachi period. Masamichi was likely from a branch of the Inbe clan in the Department of Divinities (Jingikan), though no detailed records of his life exist. Inbe is thought to be the author of the Jindai no maki kuketsu, dated to 1367 based on its foreword. One school of thought...

Inō Hidenori

  Shintoist, poet and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) in the late Edo and early Meiji periods. Also went by other names including Sanzaemon, Sanzō and Geki, and used the epistolary names Kōson and Baiu. Inō was born in 1805 in Sawara Village, Katori District, Shimofusa Province...

Inoue Kowashi

  Bureaucrat and politician of the Meiji era, who used the epistolary name Goin. Born on the eighteenth day of the twelfth month of 1843 in the castle town of Kumamoto as the third son of Iida Kengoei, a vassal of the "Nagaoka Inspector" (nagaoka kenmotsu, a high official and hereditary elder close t...

Inoue Masakane

  Founder of Misogikyō. Born on the fourth day of the eighth month of 1790, Inoue was a samurai retainer of Tatebayashi Domain in Kōzuke Province (present-day Gunma Prefecture) and the second son of Andō Makane and wife Chiyoko. Inoue was adopted by relatives named Tomita on his mother...

Inoue Yorikuni

  Meiji-era scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) and Doctor of Literature (Lit.D.). Born on the eighteenth day of the second month of 1839 in Edo's Matsushita-chō, Kanda. His father served as physician to the aristocrat Yokose Sadaatsu. Displaying a high level of maturity already during his y...

Ishida Baigan

  A scholar of the merchant (chōnin) class in the mid-Edo period, founder of Sekimon Shingaku, the school of "Heart-Mind Learning." His formal name was Kōchō, common name Kanpei, and epistolary name Baigan. He was born in the Kuwata district of Tanba Province (present-day Kyoto Prefect...

Itō Rokurobei

  Founder of the new religion Maruyamakyō. Born on the fifteenth day of the seventh month of 1829 in Noborito Village, Tachibana District in the province of Musashi (present-day Kawasaki City, Kanagawa Prefecture). The second son of Kiyomiya Genroku, Rokurobei was adopted into the Itō famil...

Iwakura Tomomi

  Courtier and politician of the late Tokugawa and early Meiji eras. Born on the fifteenth day of the ninth month of 1825 in Kyoto as the second child of court noble Horikawa Yasuchika, he was adopted by Iwakura Tomoyasu.        Tomomi was active behind the scenes in the Imperial ...

Izumoji Nobunao

  Practitioner of Suika Shintō in the mid-Edo period, and priest at the Kyoto shrine Shimo Goryōsha. Izumoji's lineage name at birth was Inbe, but he also went by the family names Itagaki and Harubara, and later changed it to Izumoji. His common name was Minbu, and he was given the Shinto k...



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