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Jihen

  A Buddhist priest of the Tendai sect active in the fourteenth century, Jihen was son of Urabe Kaneaki and elder brother of Kenkō, famed author of Tsurezuregusa (Essays in Idleness). At a young age, Jihen entered the head Tendai temple Enryakuji on Mount Hiei, where he studied Tendai doctrine. ...

Jikigyō Miroku

  Leader of Fujikō, the mid-Edo-period Shinto confraternity dedicated to the Mount Fuji cult. Successor to Hasegawa Kakugyō, the confraternity's founder, and thus responsible for the later lineage of Miroku-kō confraternities. His lay name was Itō Ihei, and he was born to a peasan...

Jiun

  Buddhist priest of the Shingon sect in the mid-Edo period, and founder of Unden Shintō. His formal name was Onkō and his style was Jiun. Born in Osaka as the son of Kōzuki Yasunori (author of Ōbaraekai [Elucidation of the Great Purification Ritual]), Jiun took the tonsure at the...

Kada no Arimaro

  Scholar of philological "evidential learning" (kōshōgaku) in the mid-Edo period. Born in 1706 in Kyoto, Arimaro was adopted together with his younger sister Tamiko by his uncle Kada no Azumamaro (1669-1736), who was then residing in Edo. Though suffering from chronic illness, he aided his...

Kada no Azumamaro

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the mid-Edo era, and known as one of the "Four Great kokugaku Scholars" (kokugaku yondaijin). Born in Kyoto in the first month of 1669, as the second son of Hanekura Nobuaki, a priest and administrator of the shrine Fushimi Inarisha (present-day Fushimi In...

Kaibara Ekiken

  Confucian scholar of the early Edo period. Known also as a herbalist and educator of commoners. A retainer of the Fukuoka Domain in Chikuzen Province (present-day Fukuoka Prefecture), Kaibara's. His formal name was Atsunobu, his style was Shisei, and his common name was Sukesaburō. He took the...

Kakei Katsuhiko

  A Shinto intellectual and scholar of public law from the Meiji to the Showa eras. Born on the twenty-eighth day of the eleventh month of 1872 in Suwa, Nagano Prefecture. After graduating from Tokyo Imperial University's School of Law, he studied administrative law in Germany for a five-year period ...

Kamei Koremi

  Lord of Tsuwano Domain in Iwami Province (present-day Shimane Prefecture) in the late Edo and early Meiji eras. Son of Arima Yorinori, lord of Kurume Domain in Chikugo Province (present-day Fukuoka Prefecture), Kamei was born in 1825 in the domain's Edo residence. He was declared the adopted son of...

Kamo no Mabuchi

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the mid-Edo period. Known as one of the "Four Great kokugaku Scholars" (kokugaku yondaijin), Kamo was born in 1697 in the domain of Enshū Hamamatsu (in present-day Shizuoka Prefecture) as the third son of Okabe Masanobu (1653-1732), descendent of a mi...

Kamo no Norikiyo

  Shintoist and proponent of Uden Shintō in Edo in the late Edo period. Also known as Umetsuji Norikiyo. Born in 1798 to the Umetsuji family of priests at the shrine Kamo Wake Ikazuchi Jinja in Kyoto. At fifteen years of age he followed his father into the Shinto priesthood and was conferred the...

Kashima Noribumi

  Imperial loyalist and member of the Shinto priesthood (shinshoku) in the late Edo and Meiji periods. Born on the thirteenth day of the first month of 1839 as the eldest son of Kashima Noritaka, who was Senior Chief Priest (daigūji; see gūji) of the shrine Kashima Jingū in Hitachi Pro...

Katō Genchi

  Shinto and religious studies scholar of the Taisho and Showa eras. Born June 17, 1873, in a True Pure Land (Jōdo Shinshū) Buddhist temple in Tokyo. After graduating in philosophy from the Department of Letters at Tokyo Imperial University, he served as professor at an army college before ...

Kawabe Kiyonaga

  Priest (shikan) at the Grand Shrine of Ise in the early Edo period. Descendent of the Ōnakatomi lineage, traditional inheritors of the office of Senior Chief Priest (daigūji) at Ise, Kawabe was part of a branch lineage and thus became a Buddhist acolyte for a period early in life. He retu...

Kawai Kiyomaru

  Shintoist and promoter of social education in the Meiji and Taisho eras. Born into a family of hereditary Shinto priests in Tōhaku District, Tottori Prefecture. Kiyomaru inherited the family priestly occupation after his father's death, serving concurrently in the positions of shashō (ass...

Kawamura Hidene

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) and samurai retainer of the Owari Nagoya Domain in the mid-Edo period. His styles included Kimifuka and Nobuyuki, common names included Kin'nosuke and Fukutarō, and he used the epistolary names Kyokushū and Ritsuan. He was born the second son of Kaw...

Kawatsura Bonji

  Founder of the religious foundation Miitsukai, focused on the practice of misogi or ablutions in water. His formal name was Tsuneji, and he also went by the family name Hasuike. He used the epistolary names Denzan and Kaorinoya, and went by the name Renge Hōin while a disciple at the Buddhist ...

Keichū

  Buddhist monk of the Shingon sect and pioneer of the early modern school of National Learning (kokugaku). Born in Amagasaki, Settsu Province (present-day Hyōgo Prefecture) as the second son of Shimogawa Motoyoshi, a retainer to Lord Aoyama, castellan of Amagasaki Castle. Keichū's father h...

Keikōin Seijun

  Buddhist nun of the Warring Provinces (sengoku) period (ca. 1467-1568). Born in Kumano (present-day Wakayama Prefecture), Seijun was third matriarch of the Buddhist convent Keisōin in Uji, Ise Province (present-day Mie Prefecture), and the Dharma-heir of Chikai Shōnin. Lamenting the long ...

Keikōin Shūyō

  Buddhist nun of the Azuchi-Momoyama period (ca. 1574-1600) and fourth matriarch of the Buddhist convent Keisōin in Uji, Ise Province (present-day Mie Prefecture). Lamenting the harm suffered by the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū) due to the civil wars of the period, Shūyō recei...

Kitabatake Chikafusa

  Courtier of the late Kamakura and North-South Court (Namboku) periods. Born in 1293 as the son of Kitabatake Moroshige (1270-1321) of the Murakami branch of the Genji clan. Highly trusted by Emperor Godaigo, he was appointed to the position of Major Councilor (dainagon), a rank superior to that hel...



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