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Kiyohara Nobukata

  Confucianist and Shintoist of the Warring Provinces (sengoku) period. He used the epistolary name Kansuiken, and was given the religious name Sōyū. Born 1475 as the third son of Yoshida Kanetomo (1435-1511), he was adopted by Kiyohara Munekata. Nobukata was sequentially assigned to the co...

Konkō Daijin

  Founder of Konkō-kyō. His childhood name was Genshichi, and he is also known as Akazawa Bunji. Born in the village of Urami in Bicchū Province (in present-day Okayama Prefecture) as the second son of the Kandori farming family. At age twelve, he was adopted into the Kawate household ...

Kōno Seizō

  Shinto priest (shinshoku) and scholar from the Meiji to the Showa eras. Professor of literature (D.Lit), his epistolary name was Shiun. Born in 1882 as the second son of Kōno Rokurō, Chief Priest (gūji) of the small shrine Tamashiki Jinja located in the town of Isai, Kita-Saitama Dis...

Kubo Sueshige

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Tokugawa and early Meiji periods. Born in 1830 to a court physician of the Tokugawa clan, Kubo was interested in the study of Japanese classics from an early age and began his studies under the kokugaku scholar Tsurumine Shigenobu (1786-1859). In ...

Kumazawa Banzan

  Confucian scholar of the early Edo period. His formal name was Hakukei (also read Noritsugu), his style was Ryōkai, and his common name was Sukezaemon. As epistolary names he used Sokuyūken and Banzan [also read Shigeyama]. Born in Kyoto as the eldest son of Nojiri Kazutoshi, he was later...

Kume Kunitake

  Scholar of modern Japanese history (D.Lit). Born on the twenty-first day of the seventh month of 1839 to a retainer of Saga Domain in Hizen Province (in present-day Saga Prefecture). In 1871, he was appointed secretary of Iwakura Tomomi's delegation (the Iwakura Mission) as it toured America and Eu...

Kuni no Miya Kuniyoshi Ō (Prince)

  Member of the Imperial family. Served as President of the Institute for the Japanese Classics (Kōten kōkyūsho, later the Faculty of Letters at Kokugakuin University) and for a time as Supreme Priest (saishu) of the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū). Born July 23, 1873, as the eld...

Kuni no Miya Tomoyoshi Shinnō, (Prince)

  Politician of the late Edo and early Meiji periods. His name is also read Prince Asahiko. The fourth child of Prince Fushimi no Miya Kuniie, he was born in Kyoto on the twenty-eighth day of the first month of 1824. His childhood names included Kumachiyo and Tomi no Miya.        ...

Kurita Hijimaro

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku), Shinto priest (shinkan), and poet of the mid-Edo era. His common name was Minbu and his style was Okanoya. He was born in 1737 to a family of priests (kannushi) at the shrine Hirao Hachimangū in Kikau District of Tōtomi Province (present-day Shizuo...

Kurita Hiroshi

  Japanese historian and Doctor of Literature (D.Lit). Born on the twenty-sixth day of the first month of 1835 in Mito Shimomachi, Hitachi Province (present-day Ibaraki Prefecture) to oil merchant Kurita Masafumi. From an early age Hiroshi became a pupil of Ishikawa Meizen, and upon recommendation by...

Kurokawa Mayori

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the Meiji era and Doctor of Literature (D.Lit). Professor Emeritus at Tokyo Imperial University. Born in Kiriyū in the province of Kōzuke (present-day Gunma Prefecture), he had the original lineage name Kaneko. He became interested in the study o...

Kurozumi Munetada

  Founder of Kurozumi-kyō. Born on the twenty-sixth day of the eleventh month (December 22), 1780, namely, the winter solstice, in the village of Kaminakano, in the Mino District of Bizen Province (present-day Okayama Prefecture). The third son of Kurozumi Muneshige, a Suppliant Priest (negi) at...

Kusakado Nobutaka

  Member of the Shinto priesthood (shinshoku) and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Edo period. His common name was Kageyu. Born in the fourth month of 1818 in Hoi District in the province of Mikawa (present-day Aichi Prefecture), Kusakado Nobutaka was the adopted son of Kusakado No...

Maki Yasuomi

  Samurai retainer and advocate of the sonnō jōi (Revere the Emperor, Expel the Barbarian) movement of the late Edo period. Born in the town of Senoshita below Kurume Castle in Chikugo Province (part of present-day Fukuoka Prefecture), Maki Yasuomi was the eldest son of Maki Samon Toshiomi,...

Mano Tokitsuna

  Mid-Edo-period priest (shinshoku) and Shintoist. His common names included Nuinosuke and Tarōtaiyu, while his epistolary names included Zōroku-ō, Matsukage-tei, Shūsen-ō, and Fujinami-ō.        Born 1648 in Owari Province (present-day Aichi Prefectu...

Maruyama Sakura

  Politician and literary figure of the Meiji period. Born on the third day of the tenth month of 1840 at the Shimabara domain residence of Matsudaira Tadakazu in the Shibamita Shikokumachi district of Edo. His father was Maruyama Masanao. In 1858 he dedicated himself as a posthumous disciple of Hira...

Masuho Zankō

  Shintoist of the mid-Edo period. His original lineage name was Takenaka, and he was given the posthumous name Monaka. He had the common names Yamato and Yamatai, and the epistolary names Taigyōō, Jisetsusai, and Chisoku Ippyōraku. Born in 1655 in Oita District in the province of Bung...

Matsuki Tomohiko

  A priest of the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū) of the mid-Edo period. His original lineage name was Watarai, and his epistolary name was Tokugetsu. Matsuki was appointed to the rank of Provisional Suppliant Priest (gon-negi) of the Outer Shrine (Gekū) already at the age of two (in 1680)...

Matsuno Isao

  Scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) and educator in the early Meiji era. Born in Hiroshima Prefecture's Mihara as the second son of Matsuno Hisayuki, a posthumous disciple of Hirata Atsutane. From early childhood Matsuno studied the Japanese and Chinese classics, and after serving in various po...

Matsuoka Mitsugi

  Shinto priest (shinshoku) and scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) of the late Tokugawa and Meiji periods. Born in the province of Sanuki (present-day Kagawa Prefecture), Matsuoka was the son of Takamatsu samurai Sano Eiji, he became the heir to the hereditary priesthood of the Matsuoka family a...



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