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Sōgakkōkei

  This was compiled by Kada no Azumamaro in one volume, and is also known by the title Sōkokugakkōkei. It is unclear when this was written. It is believed that Azumamaro wrote this to relate his own ideas about kokugaku (National Learning) and appeal to the shogunal government for permissio...

Suikabunshū

This is a compilation of Chinese and Japanese poetry as well as Japanese essays written by Yamazaki Ansai, the founder of Suika Shintō. The work was compiled by Atobe Yoshiakira and Tomobe Yasutaka, both of whom belonged to the same sect as Yamazaki. The work consists of three volumes in seven...

Sumiyoshitaishajindaiki

A record in one volume of the Sumiyoshi Shrine in Settsu compiled by Tsumori Sukune Shimamaro and Tsumori Sukune Marōdo, and sent to the Jingikan (Bureau of Divinities) in the capital in 731. It bears the seal of the Sumiyoshi District Recorder and the one of the Settsu Provincial Recorder (sh...

Tamakatsuma

  A collection of essays by Moto'ori Norinaga in fourteen volumes with one table of contents, fifteen sections total. The essays were begun in 1792, and these were published in five stages, with three volumes published each time, starting from 1795 till several years after his death in 1812. It is a ...

Tamanomihashira

  A work in two volumes written by Hirata Atsutane, first drafted in 1812. It was published the following year. This work defined the direction that Atsutane's thinking on Shintō would take, and at the time it also made quite a stir among the circles of kokugaku scholars. This work was written w...

Tenchijingi shin'chin'yōki

Completed in the fourth month of 1333. Written by Jihen, in three volumes. It is also called Sannō shinchin yōki. Seeking for consistency in classics such as the Sendai kuji honki, Nihon shoki, and Kogo shū, as well as in Ise Shintō and Ryōbu Shintō, the work tried to ...

Toyoashiharajinpūwaki

  An outline of Shintō by a Buddhist priest in three volumes. In 1340 (the year of the establishment of the Southern Court), at the request of Fujiwara Renshi (Shintaikenmon'in), the Tendai priest Jihen compiled this book for the young Emperor Gomurakami. It is said that Jihen is a brother of Yo...

Toyukekōtaijingūnenjūgyōjikonshiki

  This is a compilation of the ceremonies of the Outer Shrine (Gekū) of   The Grand Shrines of Ise during the early Edo period in seven volumes. It was begun during the Kanbun era (1661-1673) by Watarai Nobusada under the orders of the head of the outer shrine of Ise, Watarai Matahiko....

Tsukisakaki

  In five volumes. It is also called the Shidaionsho (The Book of the Four Great Obligations). Written by Suzuki Masayuki (1837-71), a kokugaku scholar active during the period spanning the end of Bakufu and the Meiji Restoration, it was finished in 1867. Not really looking at the origins of Shint...

Ubusunashakodenshō

  Notes on Old Legends of the Ubusuna Shrines. Primary work by the late early modern (bakumatsu) Hirata School kokugaku (National Learning) scholar, Mutobe Yoshika. Includes a colophon dated the eighth lunar month of 1857. Ubusuna shrines in each region are believed to have power over local productio...

Uiyamabumi

  First Steps into the Mountains. Written by Motoori Norinaga . One fascicle. Completed 1798, and published in 1799. Norinaga's academic treatise. Norinaga responded to the wishes of his disciples with this work after completing Kojikiden in the fifth month of 1798. He started writing it on the eight...

Yamatokatsuragihōzanki

A one-volume Ryōbu Shintō text of the Kamakura period which details the characteristics of the kami of heaven and earth based on Ryōbu Shintō theory. In the opening of the text, it is declared that the work was "written by Gyōki Bosatsu [the Bodhisattva Gyōki]," but su...

Yōfukuki

  This two volume work was written in the early Edo period by the shinkan of the Outer Shrine of the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū ), Deguchi Nobuyoshi. Finished in 1650 and published the next year, the Yōfuku ki was Nobuyoshi's first work of research on Shintō, written when he was ...

Yōtenki

This single volume work is generally considered to have been completed around 1223. It is also known by such names as the Sannō engi and the Hie sannō ki. Its author is unknown. Because it contains a section entitled "Sannō koto" (literally, "Sannō things") in which the doctrin...

Yuiitsushintō myōbōyōshū

  This single-volume work is considered to be the main text of Yoshida Shintō. In the postscript to the text, it is claimed that this work was compiled by Urabe Kanenobu in 1024, but in truth, the Yuiitsu Shintō myōbō yōshū was actually written by Yoshida Kanetomo (1435...

Zokushintōtaii

  This is a work written by Hirata Atsutane in four volumes. It is also called Fugaku danbei. It is a record of lectures that concluded in 1811, and belongs to the group of works known as the "Taii mono" (things dealing with the great meaning), including Kodō taii, Kangaku taii (saiseki gairon) ...



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