Encyclopedia of Shinto Kokugakuin University
 main menu
  »New EOS site

  »Home

  »Foreword

  »Guide to Usage

  »Contributors & Translators

  

  »Movies List
 Links

Other Basic Texts


« 1 2 3 (4) 5 6 »

Nakatominoharaekunge

The author and year of completion of this single volume Ryōbu Shintō text are unknown. The title kunge can be also read as kunkai, or even kinge. Although it is said that Kūkai was the author, it is speculated that the original version of the text was completed towards the end of the...

Nakatominoharaeshūsetsu

  This three volume commentary on the Nakatomi-no-harae was written by the early Edo period Kitsuke Shintō storyteller, Tachibana Mitsuyoshi, and first published in 1662. The work is a compilation of various theories and the text itself is comprised of references drawn from the Kitsuchōten,...

Naobinomitama

  This is a book about the kodō (ancient Way) theory of kokugaku. It was written by Motoori Norinaga   and is in one volume. Finished in 1771, it was included in the Kojikiden, vol. 1 published in 1790. Through a comparison of the Japanese kami and Way (dō or michi) with the Chine...

Nihonshoki sanso

  This text written by Ichijō Kaneyoshi (1402-81) and completed between 1455 and 1457. It is comprised of six volumes and three books and is a commentary on the "Jindai" volume (kan) of the Nihon shoki. Basing his text on the theory of the "unity of the three teachings" (sankyōitchi) Kaneyo...

Nihonshoki tsūshaku

  This text, comprised of seventy volumes and five books, is a commentary of the entire Nihon shoki written by the National Learning (kokugaku) scholar Iida Takesato and published in 1892. Referring extensively to earlier Edo period commentaries such as the Shoki Shūge written by Kawamura Hidene...

Nihonshoki tsūshō

  This thirty-five volume, twenty-three book work is a commentary of the entire Nihon shoki written by the Suika Shintō and National Learning (kokugaku) scholar Tanigawa Kotosuga during the mid-Edo Period. Kotosuga finished the text in 1751, and it was published by Kyoto Fūgetsudō in ...

Nihonshokiden

  This text, comprised of thirty volumes and one-hundred forty-seven books, is a commentary of the Nihon shoki written by the National Learning (kokugaku) scholar Suzuki Shigetane at the end of the Tokugawa period. Through the "Tensonkōrin" chapter of the "Jindai" volume, Shigetane gives a mult...

Nijūisshaki

This one volume work was written Kitabatake Chikafusa during the Nanbokuchō period (1336-1392). The text, originally entitled Shoshaji, is a history that focuses on the shrines which held in their possession offerings made by the Imperial Court to the "Twenty-Two Shrines" (nijūnisha). The...

Nijūnishachūshiki

This one-volume commentary concerns the Nijūnisha (the "Twenty-Two Shrines") during the Muromachi period. Together with the Nijūnisha narabi honchi, Shoshinki, Shosha kongenki, and Dainihonkoku Ichinomiya ki, this text is the result of research on shrines conducted by scholars in the Yosh...

Noritokō

  This three volume/three book work was completed by Kamono Mabuchi in 1768. Arakida Hisaoyu titled the published version Noritogoto no kamuga he ; what is popularly known as the Noritokō is a copy close to the original but without any of the "return points" (kaeriten) used to aid in the readin...

Ōbarainokotoba goshaku

  Later Commentary of the Ōharae [Great Purification] Incantations. Written by Motoori Norinaga. Two fascicles in two volumes. Revised manuscript completed the fifteenth of the seventh lunar month, 1795; published 1796. This work is a "later commentary" (goshaku) on the entry for the Ōharae...

Reikiki

One of the masterpieces of Ryōbu Shintō, this work contains fourteen volumes of text, and four volumes of figures. Kūkai (the founder of the Shingon sect of Budhism) is commonly believed the author, but it is also said that the text was conveyed by the dragon kami of Shinsen'en. Stil...

Ruijujingihongen

  A fifteen-volume corpus of Ise Shintō thought compiled by Watarai Ieyuki (completed in 1320). Using a broad comparison of both Japanese and Chinese works, the author, a priest of the Outer Shrine of the Grand Shrines of Ise (Ise Jingū), attempted to demonstrate the origin of Japanese deit...

Ryōnogige

An official annotation of the Yōrōryō, spanning ten volumes. At the order of Emperor Jiyunna, the Minster of the Right, Kiyohara Nonatsuno, served as the chief editor of an editorial board of twelve members which included the judge Okihara Nominiku and the legal scholar Sanukino Naga...

Ryōnoshūge

A thirty-volume corpus of annotations on the Yōrōryō, compiled by Koremuneno Naomoto. The present version is fifty volumes, and thirty-four of them are still extant. Among these thirty-four volumes, volumes 1, 20, and 35 have different styles and contents, and are called the Yishitsu...

Ryūkyū shintōki

This work is the oldest text on Shintō from the Ryūkyū Islands (present-day Okinawa), and includes in its scope the indigenous traditional religions of the area. This five volume work was written by the Jōdo Buddhist priest Taichū (1552-1639). While in his fifties, Taich...

Saitenryaku tsuketari saimonrei

  Saitenryaku, with an attachment of examples from Saibunrei. Written by Kusakado Nobutaka in one volume and one attachment. It was published in 1869 as the Ibukinoya Juku edition. It was revised by Kamo Tsuneharu. Nobutaka was a student of the Hirata school in Mikawa, and was a priest (kannushi ) at...

Sangeyōryakuki

This is a work from the late Kamakura period that deals with Sannō Shintō . The number of volumes and composition of this work varies dramatically depending on the manuscript, and there exists a nine-volume exemplar and a seven-volume exemplar. In the past this record was believed to be t...

Sanshatakusenkō

  This is a work investigating Sanshatakusen (The Oracles of the Three Shrines, see Sansha takusen (var. Sanja takusen) ). It was written by Ise Sadatake and comprises one volume. The colophon is dated 1784. Sadatake argued that Sansha takusen, which was popular in his day, was actually a spurious wo...

Sendaikujihongitaiseikyō

This is a Shintō work attributed to Shōtoku Taishi that expounds on the commonality of the three doctrines of Shintō, Confucianism, and Buddhism. It is compiled in seventy-two volumes, with a preface and a table of contents (divided into thirty-eight volumes called the proper part, a...



« 1 2 3 (4) 5 6 »


"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
4-10-28 Higashi, Shibuya-ku, Tokyo, 150-8440, Japan
URL http://21coe.kokugakuin.ac.jp/
Copyright ©2002-2006 Kokugakuin University. All rights reserved.
Ver. 1.3