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Sengūinhimon

A work from the Kamakura period on Ryōbu Shintō; one volume. The official title is Ise daijingū mizukashiwa chinju sengūin himon. It was believed to have been compiled by Ennin, but in reality the work originated at the Jingūji of the Sengū Shrine, Sengūin, in the...

Senkyōibun

  This is a story of the experience of the young boy, Torakichi (Takayama Katsuma), who was lured into the mountains by a long-nosed goblin (a type of being known in Japanese as Tengu) and lived eight years in a village of the sages, and then returned to his own village to relate the tale. This work ...

Shakunihongi

  This is a commentary on Nihon shoki [see Kojiki and Nihon shoki (Nihongi) ], compiled in twenty-eight volumes around the middle of the Kamakura period by Urabe Kanekata. Based on lectures his father, Kanebumi, conducted for the former Regent, Ichijō Sanetsune between the years 1274 and 1275 on...

Shingakushokaiki

This one-volume work, written by Fujitsuka Tomoaki in 1743, is also known as Kyōken senshō shokaiki. Kyōken refers to Yoshimi Yoshikazu. It is a record of numerous questions addressed by Tomoaki, priest (shinkan) at the Shiogama Shrine (modern day Shiwahiko and Shiogama Shrines), to ...

Shinnomihashiraki

  This is a work, in one volume, dealing with the secret ceremonies surrounding the "august pillar of the heart" placed on the floor of the Main Chamber of both the Inner Shrine (Naikū) and Outer Shrine (Gekū) at Ise. Because the title of this work appears in Korōkujitsuden, it is beli...

Shinsen kisōki

This is a four-volume work dealing with the origins and development of divination (kiboku) in Japan. It is said to be the work of the Urabe family, and Urabe Tōtsugu seems to have presented it to Emperor Junna in the eighth month of 830. It is a noteworthy work as it contains quotes from Kojik...

Shinten'yoku, kōten'yoku

  A collection of basic research material on Nihon shoki and Kojiki collected by Yano Harumichi. Shinten yoku refers to the first book of Kojiki (The Age of the Kami ), and Kōten yoku refers to Nihon shoki, from Book Three onward (the volumes dealing with the reigns of the mortal rulers), and th...

Shintō ameno nuboko no ki

  A work in two volumes by Izawa Banryū, published in 1720. Banryū (1688-1730) was a samurai from the Higo Kumamoto Clan, and was a popular Shintōist during the middle years of the Edo period. His common name was Nagahide, but he went by the name Banryū. He studied Suika Shint!...

Shintō denju

  This is also known as Shintō denju shō. This is a work by the Confucian scholar of the early Edo period, Hayashi Razan, that expounds the secret doctrines of Shintō. It contains a wide variety of doctrine from the various groups of Shintō, based around Yoshida Shintō, but i...

Shintō gobusho

This is the basic texts of medieval Ise Shintō (Watarai Shintō). This is the general title of the works Amaterashimasu Ise nisho kōtai jingū gochinza shidaiki (or Gochinza shidaiki ), Ise nisho kōtaijin gochinza denki (or Gochinza denki ), Toyouke kōtaijin gochinza hon...

Shintō kan'yō

  A work dealing with Ise Shintō in one volume, compiled by Watarai (Muramatsu) Ieyuki, suppliant priest (negi ) of the Outer Shrine. According to the author's colophon this work was completed the middle of the eighth month of 1317, near the end of the Kamakura period. In terms of its contents, ...

Shintō myōmoku ruijūshō

  A work in six books and six volumes. It is a work that categorizes the terminology of all aspects of the deities of heaven and earth, and then expounds upon these terms; it could even be classified as a dictionary of Shintō. It contains a preface dated the sixth month of 1699. The preface note...

Shintō nonaka no shimizu

  A work in four books and four volumes compiled in 1732 by Tomobe Yasutaka. It was printed the following year. This is an introductory text explaining Shintō in easy to understand language from the point of view of Suika Shintō. The author regrets that there are some people who are born in...

Shintō shūsei

  This is a compilation of Shintō works that Tokugawa Mitsukuni, the feudal lord of the Mito Clan, ordered Imai Ariyori and others to compile. After Ariyori died in 1683, his students Maruyama Yoshizumi, Tsuda Nobusada and others continued the work, and it was completed in twelve volumes in 1701...

Shintō taii

  This is one work of the Yoshida Shintō collection. It consists of one volume, an abbreviated version of Yoshida Shintō, written by Yoshida Kanetomo in 1486 at the request of Ashikaga Yoshimasa, who wanted a general outline of Shintō. This work is also called Yuiitsu Shintō taii ...

Shinto taii

  This is another one-volume work of the Yoshida Shintō collection. With each new generation in the Yoshida family, the family head would compile a work with this title, and this text belongs to this group. The author is Yoshida Kanemi (1535-1610), who is a great grandson of Yoshida Kanetomo. Li...

Shintō taiikōdan

  It is also known as Shintō taii bunsho. It is a compilation in one volume of the lectures given by Yoshikawa Koretari, recorded by a student of his, Fuwa Koremasu. This work was completed in 1669. The topic of the lectures was Urabe Kanenao's Shintō taii. This work is believed to be a fab...

Shintōshū

Also known as Shosha kongen-shō, it is a collection of about fifty Shintō stories (setsuwa) compiled into ten volumes. It seems to have been compiled between the years of 1352 and 1361, but it is unclear who the compiler was. There is a theory that someone steeped in the traditions of the...

Shirushi no sugi

  This is the work of Ban Nobutomo , consists of one volume, and was finished in 1835. It contains research into the Inari Shrine of Yamashiro Province (Fushimi Inari). One section was published in 1842 in Ōōhitsugo, second volume. The background for the writing of this work has to do with ...

Shokishūge

  This work is a commentary on Nihon shoki [see Kojiki and Nihon shoki (Nihongi) ] in thirty volumes, compiled by Kawamura Hidene, an official of the Owari domain and also a student of kokugaku, and his son, Masune. It is written in classical Chinese with interlinear readings of the characters. This ...



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