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Kami in Classic Texts


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Hohodemi

  Other names: Hoori no mikoto(Kojiki, Nihongi), Hoorihiko hohodemi no mikoto(Nihongi), Yamasachibiko(Kojiki), Yamasachihiko(Nihongi), Soratsuhiko (Kojiki)Offspring of Ninigi and Konohana Sakuyahime. Called Yamasachihiko ("mountain-gift-man") for his unique success in the hunt, he is known as a membe...

Homudawake

  Other names: Hondawake no mikoto(Kojiki, Nihongi)Given name of Emperor Ōjin, offspring of Emperor Chūai and his consort Okinagatarashihime. According to Kojiki, Homudawake was an alternate name for Ōtomo Wake no mikoto. It is also said to have been the original name of the central de...

Honoakari

  According to Nihongi, one of three kami born to Konohana no Sakuyahime after spending a single night cohabiting with Ninigi. Honoakari is claimed as the first ancestor of the clan called Owari no Muraji, but differing birth orders are described in the various traditions transmitted by Nihongi. Acco...

Hoshinokamikakaseo

  Other names: Amatsumikahoshi, Ame no kakaseo (Nihongi)An astral kami appearing in Nihongi. Ordered by the heavenly kami to pacify the Central Land of Reed Plains, the two kami Futsunushi and Takemikazuchi descended to the Central Land and subdued the noxious indigenous kami together with the kami o...

Hosuseri

  According to Kojiki, Konohana Sakuyahime became pregnant after cohabiting a single night with Ninigi, but Ninigi questioned whether she had actually become pregnant so readily. In anger at Ninigi's suspicions, Sakuyahime built a long parturition hut and entered it; setting fire to the hut, she gave...

Hosusori

  According to the main text of Nihongi, one of three kami born to Ninigi and Ōyamatsumi's daughter Kamuatatsuhime (Konohana Sakuyahime). Sakuyahime set fire to her parturition hut and there gave birth to three kami, of whom Hosusori was the first, born from the first rising smoke. According to ...

Ichikishimahime

  Other names: Sayoribime no mikoto (Kojiki)One of the three female kami produced as a result of the trial by pledge (ukei) between Amaterasu and Susanoo, Ichikishimahime is enshrined at the Hetsugū, one of three shrines at the Munakata Taisha in the old province of Chikuzen (present-day Fukuoka...

Ihika

  A chthonic kami (kunitsukami) depicted as having a tail, and which appeared from a glowing well or spring during Emperor Jinmu's eastern campaign. Both Nihongi and Kojiki state that he was the ancestor of the indigenous Yoshino no Obito peoples. The motif of a "glowing well" is believed to suggest ...

Ikugui, Tsunukui

  Other names: Tsu no kui(Kojiki, Nihongi)The deities Ikugui and Tsunukui (or Tsunugui) were paired kami which came into being as the fourth of the first "seven generations of the age of the kami" (kamiyo). The name Ikugui comes from iku, which means to be active or vital, and kui (or gui), which mea...

Ikutamayoribime

  The daughter of Suetsumimi no mikoto and lover of Ōmononushi. According to Kojiki, the attractive Ikutamayoribime had a fine-looking male visitor who came to her each night, yet whose name she did not know. At last Ikutamayoribime became pregnant, and in order to determine her paramour's ident...

Inadanomiyanushisuganoyatsumimi

  Other names: Inada no miyanushi susa no yatsumimi no kami(Nihongi) "Master(s) of the Inada palace at Suga." After killing the serpent Yamata no orochi at Suga, Susanoo took as wife Kushinadahime, and gave the name Inada no Miyanushi Suga no Yatsumimi to her parents Tenazuchi no kami and Ashinazuchi...

Ishikoridome

  Offspring of Amanonukato no mikoto, and claimed as ancestral deity of the Kagami-zukuri, or "mirror-maker" clan. At the time of Amaterasu's hiding away in the rock cave of heaven, the deity Omoikane no mikoto had bellows made from a deer's hide, and ordered Ishikoridome to forge a mirror from metal...

Isotakeru

  Other names: Itakeru(Nihongi) A name found only in Nihongi; in Kojiki, the same kami appears under the name Ōyabiko no kami. An offspring of Susanoo, Isotakeru descended with his father to the Korean kingdom of Silla bearing tree seeds, but he did not plant them there, returning with them ins...

Isukeyorihime

  Other names: Hime tatara isuzuhime no mikoto (Nihongi)Consort of Emperor Jinmu. According to Kojiki, the kami Ōmononushi of Miwa saw Seyadatarahime, daughter of Mizokui of Mishima, and immediately fell in love with her. While the girl was relieving herself beside a stream, Ōmononushi tran...

Iwanagahime

  A daughter of Ōyamatsumi. Ōyamatsumi offered both his beautiful daughter Konohana Sakuyahime and her older sister Iwanagahime in marriage to Ninigi. Ninigi, however, could not bear Iwanagahime's unattractive appearance and returned her to her father. According to Kojiki, Ōyamatsumi t...

Iwaoshiwakunoko

  A kunitsukami (earthly kami) that appeared during Jinmu's eastern campaign from Kumano to Yoshino, and became his ally. Both Kojiki and Nihongi describe Iwaoshiwakunoko as having a tail, and as appearing by pushing aside the boulders in order to meet the procession of the offspring of the heavenly ...

Iwasaku, Nesaku

  Two kami produced as Izanagi killed the fire kami Kagutsuchi. When Izanami gave birth to Kagutsuchi, she suffered mortal burns. Enraged, her consort Izanagi drew his sword and beheaded Kagutsuchi. The blood that dripped from the point of his sword splashed onto many rocks (Kojiki states "masses of ...

Iwatsutsunoo, Iwatsutsunome

  According to Kojiki, one (or one pair) of three kami which came into existence from the blood adhering to the sword with which Izanagi killed the fire deity Kagutsuchi (see also Iwasaku, Nesaku). According to an "alternate writing" describing this event in Nihongi, Izanagi cut Kagutsuchi into three...

Izanagi

  According to Kojiki and Nihongi, one of the two kami (together with his consort Izanami) principally responsible for the formation of the world. Various theories have been proposed to explain the name, but it is usually assumed that iza means "invite" (izanau), while the suffixes ki (or gi) and mi ...

Izanami

  Consort of the kami Izanagi. The name Izanami has been understood in various ways, but most interpretations agree that iza means "invite" (izanau), while mi means "female." As the kami responsible for the birth of various other kami representing the land and its contents, Izanami has strong connota...



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