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Combinatory Kami


§ Combinatory Kami

  Often translated "kami-buddha syncretism," shinbutsu shūgō refers to the complex phenomenon of "combinatory" interaction between Japanese beliefs in jingi or kami ("deities"), and the foreign, established religion of Buddhism. While this description is basically accurate in transmitting t...

Gohō

"Protector of Dharma." Also called Gohō dōji (lit., "child protector of the dharma") or Gohō zenshin ("good-deity protector of the dharma"), figures originally appearing as minor tutelaries within Buddhism. Within the mountain sect of Shugendō, Gohō were considered deities ...

Gozu Tennō

Literally, "ox-head-heaven-king." Also called Gion Tenjin, Gozu Tennō is a product of kami-buddha "combinatory" religion, worshiped at the Gion Shrine (Yasaka Jinja) in Kyoto, and at other shrines such as Tsushima, Tennō, Susanoo, and Yakumo. Originating as a deity of pestilence, Gozu Ten...

Izuna Gongen

A kami worshiped by practitioners of the Izuna shugen cult. Also called Izuna Myōjin, this kami is enshrined in the Izuna Shrine at the summit of Mt. Izuna in the district of Kamiminochi, Nagano Prefecture. The Izuna cult first appears historically in the second part of the Kamakura-period wor...

Kōjin

Literally "rough deity," the Buddhist tutelary Kōjin is usually depicted with six arms and three faces displaying angry expressions, and is known as guardian of the "three treasures" of Buddhism-the Buddha, the Dharma, and the sangha or congregation of monk-priests). Originally, the term "...

Sanjūbanshin

"The Thirty Tutelaries," a cultic belief in thirty tutelary kami that alternate each day of the month to protect the Lotus Sutra and the Japanese nation. The cult is especially prevalent within the Nichiren sect. The conceptual ground for the cult originated in the Tendai sect on Mt. Hiei, based on...

Seiryū Gongen

Other names: Seirō GongenLiterally "Clear-Falls-Avatar," this deity was one of the "protectors of the dharma" (gohō;) in the Shingon sect of Buddhism, and tutelary of the temple Daigoji in Kyoto. Originally a tutelary of the "Blue Dragon Temple" (Ch. Qing-long-si; Jp. Shōryūji) ...

Sekisan Myōjin

Literally, "Red-Mountain Shining-Deity," one of the "protectors of the dharma" (gohō;) in the Tendai sect of Buddhism. While studying Buddhism in China, the Japanese monk Ennin underwent practice at the Shandong temple Sekizan Hokke-in (Ch. Chishan Fahua Yuan) for the purpose of receiving a pe...

Shikigami

Kami invoked as familiar spirits within the cult of Onmyōdō. Also read as shikijin, or shiki no kami. The shikigami are believed to have originated in the twelve monthly tutelary deities (Chōmei, Kakai, Jūkai, Densō, Shōkichi, Shōsen, Taiichi, Tenkō, Daish...

Shinra Myōjin

One of the "protectors of the dharma" (gohō;) in the Tendai sect of Buddhism, and tutelary of the famous temple Onjōji (Miidera) in Ōmi, Shiga Prefecture. According to legend, during the return of Enchin (Chishō Daishi) from China, a deity called Shinra Myōjin appeared onbo...

Ugajin

Other names: Uka no kamiAn obscure kami worshiped as a deity of fortune from the early medieval period on. Fused with the Buddhist deity Benzaiten, the kami became known as Uga Benten, and was also called by the titles Uga Shinnō ("divine-king Uga") and Uga Shinshō ("divine-commander Uga"...

Zaō Gongen

The "Avatar Zaō," also known as Kongō Zaō Bosatsu ("Bodhisattva Zaō of the Diamond Realm"), a deity unique to Japan's Shugendō sect. Originally a tutelary of Buddhism, Shūkongōshin (Skt. Vajrapani) evolved successively into the Bodhisattva Kongō Zaō and ...





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