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Business Shrines
Many Japanese corporations and businesses have shrines on their property or within their buildings. Little attention was paid to these facilities until the Jinja Shinpōsha (the publishing house for the Association of Shinto Shrines) published a survey in the book Kigyō no jinja [Business shrines]. Reading this work gives one a fascinating insight into the unusual relationship between shrines and business corporations. Here are several examples based on those in the book; not surprisingly, Inari shrines seem to be highly popular: Asahi Jinja (Asahi Breweries); Terebi Asahi Inari Jinja (TV Asahi); Ishikawa Inari Jinja and Toyoshu Jinja (Ishikawajima Harima Heavy Industries); Munakata Jinja (Idemitsu Kosan), Ōji Jinja (Ōji Paper); Fushimi Inari Jinja (Kagome Company, Ltd.); Kotohira Jinja (Kikkoman Corporation); Sapporo Shrine (Sapporo Breweries); Seikō Inari (Shiseidō Co., Ltd.); Takechiyo Inari (Takenaka Corporation); Toyosu Inari (Tokyo Gas); Tōyoko Jinja (Tokyu Corporation); Izumo Jinja (Toshiba Corporation), Hōkō Jinja (Toyota Motor Corporation); Nagoya Kyūjo Jinja (Nagoya Stadium); Nikkō Katori Jinja (Japan Airlines); Kumano Jinja (Hitachi Ltd.); Mimeguri Jinja (Mitsui Group), Mitsubishi Inari (Tokyo-Mitsubishi Bank).
The Haneda Airport Jinja at Haneda Airport protecting air travellers

Tokyo, 2005

©Ōsawa Kōji

A shrine dedicated to the seven deities of luck and prosperity (shichifukuden) located on top of the Takashimaya department store in the Nihonbashi area.

Tokyo, 2006

©Ōsawa Kōji

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