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Home » 8. Schools, Groups, and Personalities » Modern Sectarian Groups
Ōmiwakyō (Sako)
A Shinto-derived new religion founded by Sako Kan (1878-1937). Born in Nara prefecture, Sako was the second daughter of Murakami Kisaburō and Murakami Shiyu and it is said she exhibited spiritual powers from the age of about ten onwards. After marrying Sako Tsunezō she engaged in Shinto-related disciplines and, in due course, began performing faith healings using ritual prayer and herbal remedies, thus gathering devotees. Following a divine oracle in 1909, she established a place of practice at the foot of Mount Miwa, taking up residence there and devoting herself to religious activities. In order to conduct proselytizing activities, she became a teacher in the Ōmiwa branch of Shinto Honkyoku. In 1921 she established a religious center in Sakurai City. Kan died in 1937 and was succeeded by her eldest son, Sako Sakae who became designated as the first director (kanchō) of the movement. The movement was registered as a religious association under the Religious Organizations Law (Shūkyō dantaihō) of 1940. In 1943 it transferred its affiliation to Shinrikyō, and in 1946 became a major branch organization of that movement. In 1948, however, it became independent as Ōmiwakyō. After Sakae died in 1970, Sako Hiroshi became its second Director.
Headquarters:Nara Prefecture.
Nominal membership: approximately 10,000.

- Inoue Nobutaka
"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
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