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Home » 8. Schools, Groups, and Personalities » Personalities
Iida Takesato
(1827-1900)
A scholar of National Learning (kokugaku) and follower of the teachings of Hirata Atsutane (1176-1843). Iida was born on the sixth day of the twelfth month of 1827 in the Edo residence of the lord of Shinano Takashima Domain (of the Suwa clan, holders of 30,000 koku, part of present-day Nagano Prefecture). In 1843 at the age of seventeen he moved to the Suwa clan's home region. He corresponded with other kokugaku scholars such as Kurasawa Yoshiyuki in nearby Ina, and in the autumn of 1867 left the domain to join a group of then-obscure kokugaku scholars including Gonda Naosuke (1809-87) and Ochiai Naoaki (1826-94) who had gathered around Iwakura Tomomi (1825-83) in Kyoto.
       In 1868 he was appointed as a teacher to the Kōgakusho, a kokugaku school established by the new Meiji government, and later served as chief priest (gūji) at the shrines Kehi Jingū, Suwa Taisha, Nukisaki Jinja and Sengen Jinja, and in 1875 became an instructor at the Great Teaching Institute (Taikyōin). After this he removed himself from duties as a priest (shinshoku) and focused on teaching. In 1878 he was appointed to a position at the Shūshikan, the early Meiji period Institute of Historigraphy, and from 1880 to 1886 served as professor at the University of Tokyo (Imperial University). From 1888 he taught at the Kōten Kōkyūsho (forerunner of Kokugakuin University) and until he returned to teaching undergraduates at the Imperial University in 1896 he lectured at Keiō University and at Jingū Kyōkō, a school affiliated with the Grand Shrines of Ise(Ise Jingū); he also was a member of the Japanese Historical Society (Shigaku Kyōkai) and the Ōyashima Association (Ōyashima Gakkai). He died in Tokyo on August 26 1900 at the age of seventy-four. He was chief contributor to the Nihon shoki tsūshaku (a 70-volume commentary on the Nihon shoki), and his writings also appear in the Hōshitsushū poetry collection.

- Akimoto Nobuhide
"Establishment of a National Learning Institute for the Dissemination of Research on Shinto and Japanese Culture"
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